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Bleeding Brakes With Turning Brakes

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I have never bleed brakes with turning brakes is there anything special to it? I am just bleeding them normal by the pedal, but wondering if I have to do anything special with the turning brakes. I keep losing pressure after they are bled.

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Do you have a residual valve??

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Are you bleeding the brakes starting with the wheel furthest from the master cylinder??

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There is, when I bought mine I remember something about pulling them to bleed out the system just like you do with your foot. Sorry, dont remember exactly.

I do remember that you cant (or I cant) hold the cutting brake handle back if you push on the brakes. Stepping on the brakes forces the cutting brake handle forward.

Edited by adbrothers

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You need to pressure bleed them!

CNC sells a Pressure bleed cap that screws right on the master cylinder with a built in schrader Valve drilled and tapped right into the top of the cap.

Look it up on their website or make on yourself...

:pece:

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You need to pressure bleed them!

CNC sells a Pressure bleed cap that screws right on the master cylinder with a built in schrader Valve drilled and tapped right into the top of the cap.

Look it up on their website or make on yourself...

:pece:

I had one of those, now I use a "sucker", like a vacume pump.

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Do you have a residual valve??

No I do not have a residual valve. Do I need to run one?

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Do you have a residual valve??

No I do not have a residual valve. Do I need to run one?

They hold pressure in the line, they sell two pressures. One is for disk and one for drum. 7lbs. and 9lbs. I think or maybe 11lbs. I have one and like it.

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mine are cnc and have a 2 psi residual valve in line and cutting brakes. i bled mine just like a normal vehicle and they work perfect. and yes you do need the residual valve or you will need to pump the brakes up every time you run.

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I have the same prob. I know hotrnhell also had the same problem. I will be ordering a residual value tomorrow. Is there a better place to put the value or just off the master?

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I have the same prob. I know hotrnhell also had the same problem. I will be ordering a residual value tomorrow. Is there a better place to put the value or just off the master?

I was told and put mine right at the master. If you have front and back brakes with 2 res you need two of them.

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there are 2 ways that i like to bleed the brakes, 1st is using a air bleeder and a canaster at the end with a line on the bottle so i know were the master cylinder will run out, I fill the master, then use the air bleeder, turn the preasure down to 3lbs, bleed the farthest brake, then as the fluid is flowing pull up slowly on the turn brake and release slowly( this will push the air out ) then shut the bleed screw on the calipar.

the other way is pump up the pedal, open the farthest brake, push down on the pedal, then pull up on the turn brake, close calipar bleed screw then, slowly let down the turn brake, then slowly release the pedal, then do this all over again.

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mine are cnc and have a 2 psi residual valve in line and cutting brakes. i bled mine just like a normal vehicle and they work perfect. and yes you do need the residual valve or you will need to pump the brakes up every time you run.

thats weird, i have never ran one of those before. always just got lucky i guess

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I ordered resdiual valve and pressure bleeder cap! I will keep you updated when the arrive...

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there are 2 ways that i like to bleed the brakes, 1st is using a air bleeder and a canaster at the end with a line on the bottle so i know were the master cylinder will run out, I fill the master, then use the air bleeder, turn the preasure down to 3lbs, bleed the farthest brake, then as the fluid is flowing pull up slowly on the turn brake and release slowly( this will push the air out ) then shut the bleed screw on the calipar.

the other way is pump up the pedal, open the farthest brake, push down on the pedal, then pull up on the turn brake, close calipar bleed screw then, slowly let down the turn brake, then slowly release the pedal, then do this all over again.

pretty sure we do it similar to this as well, yes you have to bleed the turn brake too as it will collect air and not function.

my normal brake pedal worked fine stopped both wheels, but the turn brake never worked until we bled it as well

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there are 2 ways that i like to bleed the brakes, 1st is using a air bleeder and a canaster at the end with a line on the bottle so i know were the master cylinder will run out, I fill the master, then use the air bleeder, turn the preasure down to 3lbs, bleed the farthest brake, then as the fluid is flowing pull up slowly on the turn brake and release slowly( this will push the air out ) then shut the bleed screw on the calipar.

the other way is pump up the pedal, open the farthest brake, push down on the pedal, then pull up on the turn brake, close calipar bleed screw then, slowly let down the turn brake, then slowly release the pedal, then do this all over again.

pretty sure we do it similar to this as well, yes you have to bleed the turn brake too as it will collect air and not function.

my normal brake pedal worked fine stopped both wheels, but the turn brake never worked until we bled it as well

I was also told that you never push your turning brake forward. just let the pumping of the pedal bring the turning brake handle back. Went to fodrills and got a residual value and Denny told me how to bleed them. I will find out next full moon ride. just a couple of weeks away.

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I put the residual valve on that definetly helped still seems a little mushy but much improved.

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Are you traping air in the turning brake? You may have to unbolt the turning brake and turn unit to get the air out. Or put a bleeder in the top of the unit.

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The Correct way to bleed turning brakes:

1. Brake pedal down (Do not pump, step down once and hold it)

2. Open bleeder at caliper/drum

3. Turning brake engage and hold

4. Close bleeder at caliper

5. Release brake pedal

6. Release turning brake

7. If fluid has air go back to step 1 and repeat. When fluid is without air go to step 8

8. Do other side

A residual valve is for keeping the pistons from retracting into the bore of the brake caliper or cylinder while driving. As you drive around bouncing over the dunes the brake piston is slowly working its way back inside the cylinder displacing the brake fluid back into the master cylinder until the point where you need more than one pump of the master cylinder/brake pedal to take up the lost volume. Symptom of needing a check valve is when you step on your brakes and they will go to the floor requiring pumping up until you get your brake pedal back. A scary experience when you step on your brake pedal and it goes to the floor. Installing a check valve stops the brake fluid back to the master cylinder thereby eliminating the “to the floor” pedal syndrome. Brake pedal will always be at the top and ready to “stop on a dime with nine cents change”.

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The Correct way to bleed turning brakes:

1. Brake pedal down (Do not pump, step down once and hold it)

2. Open bleeder at caliper/drum

3. Turning brake engage and hold

4. Close bleeder at caliper

5. Release brake pedal

6. Release turning brake

7. If fluid has air go back to step 1 and repeat. When fluid is without air go to step 8

8. Do other side

A residual valve is for keeping the pistons from retracting into the bore of the brake caliper or cylinder while driving. As you drive around bouncing over the dunes the brake piston is slowly working its way back inside the cylinder displacing the brake fluid back into the master cylinder until the point where you need more than one pump of the master cylinder/brake pedal to take up the lost volume. Symptom of needing a check valve is when you step on your brakes and they will go to the floor requiring pumping up until you get your brake pedal back. A scary experience when you step on your brake pedal and it goes to the floor. Installing a check valve stops the brake fluid back to the master cylinder thereby eliminating the “to the floor” pedal syndrome. Brake pedal will always be at the top and ready to “stop on a dime with nine cents change”.

x2

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The Correct way to bleed turning brakes:

1. Brake pedal down (Do not pump, step down once and hold it)

2. Open bleeder at caliper/drum

3. Turning brake engage and hold

4. Close bleeder at caliper

5. Release brake pedal

6. Release turning brake

7. If fluid has air go back to step 1 and repeat. When fluid is without air go to step 8

8. Do other side

A residual valve is for keeping the pistons from retracting into the bore of the brake caliper or cylinder while driving. As you drive around bouncing over the dunes the brake piston is slowly working its way back inside the cylinder displacing the brake fluid back into the master cylinder until the point where you need more than one pump of the master cylinder/brake pedal to take up the lost volume. Symptom of needing a check valve is when you step on your brakes and they will go to the floor requiring pumping up until you get your brake pedal back. A scary experience when you step on your brake pedal and it goes to the floor. Installing a check valve stops the brake fluid back to the master cylinder thereby eliminating the “to the floor” pedal syndrome. Brake pedal will always be at the top and ready to “stop on a dime with nine cents change”.

Thanks! NOw where to put the check valve?

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I would install one check valve at the master cylinder before the brake lines branch off to the rear and front.

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I am running brakes on front and rear with dual master cylinders. I put one in line for the front brakes and 2 in line ( one for each side) for the rear brakes after the turn brake since it is also a cylinder. May be over kill but i hate it when the pedal hits the floor.

Mike

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