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QueenGlamis

Prime Rib

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I do not have a smoker and my grill is gas so it would have to be in the oven. Any ideas? :1cheff:

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This is what I was thinking of doing, found this recipe, copy/paste easier than typing:

1 standing beef rib roast (4 to 7 ribs, 9 to 18 pounds)

fresh course-ground black pepper, as needed

kosher salt (or other larger grain, flake-style salt), 1/2 teaspoon per bone

softened butter, 1/2 tbsp per rib of beef

large metal roasting pan with at least 3-inch sides.

2 tbsp flour

1 quart cold beef broth

Preparation:

Remove the prime rib from the refrigerator and place in the pan. No rack is needed as the rib bones form a natural rack, and will keep the prime rib off the pan. Rub the entire surface of the cold roast with butter, and coat evenly with the kosher salt and black pepper.

Leave the prime rib out at room temperature for 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. When the oven is hot, put the roast in and cook for 20 minutes to sear the outside of the roast. After 20 minutes turn the oven down to 325 degrees F. and roast until the desired internal temperature is reached (see guide below). For medium-rare this will take approximately 15 minutes per pound.

Transfer to a large platter, and let the prime rib rest, loosely covered with foil for 30 minutes before serving. Cutting into the meat too early will cause a significant loss of juice.

To Make the "Au Jus" Sauce

While the prime rib is resting, pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the fat from the pan and place on the stovetop over medium heat. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes to form a roux. Pour in the beef broth and whisk into the roux, scraping all the caramelized beef drippings from the bottom of the pan.

Turn heat to high and cook the sauce for 10 minutes until it reduces and thickens slightly (this is not a gravy, so don't expect a thick, heavy sauce). Adjust seasoning, strain and serve along side the prime rib.

Internal Temperature Guide

Below are the internal temperatures to go by, depending on how done you like your prime rib. Remember, these are the temperatures to remove the beef, and not the final temperature. The roast will continue to cook after it's removed.

Rare: remove at 110 degrees F. (final temp about 120)

Medium-Rare: remove at 120 degrees F. (final temp about 130)

Medium: remove at 130 degrees F. (final temp about 140)

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That's about right. The high heat at the beginning then lowering the temp works the best. Do not overcook!

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cook it rare to medium rare. anything more than that, is a waste of good meat. prime rib = yummy.

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We cook ours at 500 degrees for 5 minutes per pound then turn the oven off, but do not open the door leave it closed for three hours. Comes out perfect every time.

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Can I come to your house. My mom used to cook an awsome prime rib. I should cook one this year.

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They are on sale at Safeway this week-4.50 a pound. The butcher there will hook me up with a really nice roast, just got to work up the courage to JUST DO IT! :lol:

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First and foremost, you have to start with a USDA Prime cut of beef. A USDA Choice standing rib roast is just a standing rib eye roast, not a prime rib. Costco had some Prime Rib roasts for $15/lb the other day, about $90-100 ea. Most stores in Santee never get Prime beef, one butcher (Food4Less) even told me a lot of their beef isn't even Choice!

A friend of ours is the Executive Chef for Brandt Beef (out of Brawley) which is the supplier of beef to Ramey's Meats. Their beef is organically grown, which I never really thought about. However, after tasting a couple of their ribeyes, there is a HUGE difference in the quality of the beef from different suppliers. What she gave me was graded Choice, but it was so tender, and so well marbled, it tasted like I had cooked it in butter! I'm going to get a Prime Rib roast from her for our camp from Xmas-New Years.

I just talked to her, she said if you want the best deal on a prime rib or standing rib roast, call Ramey's. He sells Brandt beef for at least $3/lb less than the specialty stores that sell it. She recommended getting the Choice cut, she says it's so close you really can't tell the difference in marbling/quality.

Speaking of roux, Janet's cousin Susan is a chef, and she told me a neat trick she used for making large quantities of roux quickly. Instead of caramelizing the juice in one of your good pans (a lot of people have teflon pans) she would use an old cookie sheet, over the stove burner. Tilt the sheet to get the juice to spread where you want it to, the large flat area will caramelize it quickly, then scrape it off into a stock pot and do some more.

This method was used to make large quantities for a restaurant, but you could quickly make enough for a family this way.

My brother-in-law surprised the hell out of me one year by cooking a prime rib on his grill. My sister made a dry rub she got from Emeril's website, he started a large pile of charcoal, separated it into two smaller piles and we put a throw-away med. roasting pan in the middle. He quickly seared the roast over one of the piles, then moved it over the roasting pan with the bones upward and never turned it. The juices dripped into the roasting pan and he made the roux from that.

That came out superb, medium rare in the center, well done on the ends!! Even though my sister is a vegetarian, my BIL was jockeying to get a large portion of the leftovers for himself!

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I am the first one to say that Rameys has some of the best meat I have ever eaten, and your info confirms why! But holy moly Andy, 100.00 for a roast! :scared: I was debating about it when it was 30.00 @ Safeway (the butcher there is very cool and always will bring me the "stash" from the back and cut/trim anyway I want) looked like a nice selection when I looked last night, nice marbling, appropriate amount of fat with a nice big eye in the center. Costco has great meat as well I just don't have a Costco card, but I think Kim does. :deal:

Guess I will just come camp with you Steve and my dilemma is solved :lol: Thanks for the info!

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You should look into dry aging the roast. I did one last year. I dry aged it for 10 days. I will go 14 or more next time. It was real good!

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You should look into dry aging the roast. I did one last year. I dry aged it for 10 days. I will go 14 or more next time. It was real good!

More info please! I was going to buy the roast before they go off sale, will be cooking next weekend, but did not want to put in freezer or have it go "bad" in fridge. I recall Wild Bill posted some info on this process a while back?

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You can google the dry age process. It really is easy. It works best if you have a garage fridge. You pat it dry, do not trim. Wrap it loosely in cheesecloth, put it on a cookie sheet and every day you unwrap it and re-wrap it. That keeps it from sticking. It will loose some water weight and concentrate the flavor.

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I am the first one to say that Rameys has some of the best meat I have ever eaten, and your info confirms why! But holy moly Andy, 100.00 for a roast! :scared: I was debating about it when it was 30.00 @ Safeway (the butcher there is very cool and always will bring me the "stash" from the back and cut/trim anyway I want) looked like a nice selection when I looked last night, nice marbling, appropriate amount of fat with a nice big eye in the center. Costco has great meat as well I just don't have a Costco card, but I think Kim does. :deal:

Guess I will just come camp with you Steve and my dilemma is solved :lol: Thanks for the info!

Just to be clear, the $90 roast was at Costco. I don't know how much Ramey is charging per lb, but if it's anything under $15/lb, then IMHO it's a better value than Costco.

We did lobster tails last season, everyone chipped in $10 ea and that paid for their tail, then we cooked them all together. I'm not going to spend $100 to feed everyone in camp like I used to a few seasons ago but if everyone wants to chip in, I'll pick it up and cook it.

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Sounds exactly how my wife prepares the prime rib and it comes out great every time. We get them locally from Midwestern Meats on Main between Greenfield and Higley and if I recall, they are very reasonably priced.

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We cook ours at 500 degrees for 5 minutes per pound then turn the oven off, but do not open the door leave it closed for three hours. Comes out perfect every time.

This is how we do it also . Only problem is never anything left over .

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We cook ours at 500 degrees for 5 minutes per pound then turn the oven off, but do not open the door leave it closed for three hours. Comes out perfect every time.

This is how we do it also . Only problem is never anything left over .

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Hey Queen Glamis pull the cord and jump in the fire!

Let us know how it comes out

:cuz:

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You can't go wrong with Brandt Beef. The best I ever had. Know the Brandt family well.

Is this chef you talk about, is her name Cathy S.? If so, tell her Brad and Karen say hi, she did our wedding.

Yes, that's her! Will do!

We were at the charger's game last weekend with her for her birthday. She was getting a little chilly so I ordered a Charger's windbreaker for her from Amazon on my phone. She got a big kick out of being able to order something like that on a phone! :lol:

I'm going to give it to her next week, I'll tell her you said "Hi!" :cheers:

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Salt pepper and slit the meat all over the place and jam in garlic slivers :D then cook ohhhh yumm.. wait ill have some saturday woohoo..

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rotisserie!!!!!! i do prime rib at least 5-6 times a year, and will not eat it anywhere else. faberware electric is best imho. found at garage sales for cheap.

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I cook prime rib & ribeye roasts in the oven all the time.

Low cooking temp and DON'T OVERCOOK are the keys.

One of these remote thermometers make it easy.

Taylor%20Digital%20Oven%20Thermometer%20

I set it so that the alarm goes off at 122 degrees (by the time you pull it out, it'll read 125)...let it rest, then you'll have a perfect medium-rare hunk of meat.

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rotisserie!!!!!! i do prime rib at least 5-6 times a year, and will not eat it anywhere else. faberware electric is best imho. found at garage sales for cheap.

Yep! 24 minutes per pound, outside rub of your choice, let it rest for 10 minutes, and you can't go wrong. Having a 2-rib piece tomorrow or Friday from Albertsons that we got for 1/2 off from $9.99/lb. Ended up costing about $22.

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Cost co has them all seasoned, in a pan with directions.

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I grill them a few times a year. And yes its gas. Just use indirect heat...

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I grill them a few times a year. And yes its gas. Just use indirect heat...

There ya go. I don't use, or even own gas grills, but the ticket is indirect heat.

I use indirect heat in my charcoal grill, no searing first, just rub the roast, let it sit to come to room temp, place it in a pan in the middle of the grill. Remove the pan in a few hours with the good juices for gravy, pan sauce, etc. I cook mine until I think they're done, and they come out med rare from close to the edge all the way to the middle. I usually get a 5-8 bone prime rib from the comissary, on base at about $5-6/lb. Can't beat that price either.

(If by chance you have leftovers, make some beef strokenoff)

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