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Front Of Buggy Too Light, Looking For Different Options

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Okay, short little old school buggy, Toyota 4A-GE motor, IRS trans, standard trailing arms.

Problem is the front is too light.

Suggested so far was to add a foot to front, and also move seats forward about a foot, also was suggested to weight the front. The car rides fairly well now, the whoopdies get it swapping about a bit, and like I said, it wheelies way to easily, hard to get it to steer.

Any suggestions/pics of ways to correct this?

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John I had a two seater that was pretty light, in the front, I took a 1" thick steel plate drilled four holes in it and mounted to the frontend floor, weighed about sixty pounds, but gave me so much control. My current car had 125 lbs of plate added to the front, nice balance/control.

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something else you can do, army surplus and pick up a couple mortar tubes (the ones that hold the mortar shells) or a couple ammo boxes, you can fill with sand, tools, whatever and mount one on either side of the front end, very easy to adjust the weight.

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I would extend the rear of the cage (set motor/trans back)

Cutting brakes are your friend... :)

Edited by Legit Duner

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Any suggestions/pics of ways to correct this?

The answer to your problem is here.

Oh yah, and forgot to say, needs to be cheap, and not exceed 72" wide so it will fit in my TH... :)

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John I had a two seater that was pretty light, in the front, I took a 1" thick steel plate drilled four holes in it and mounted to the frontend floor, weighed about sixty pounds, but gave me so much control. My current car had 125 lbs of plate added to the front, nice balance/control.

Great idea, after watch it i think you need about 100 lbs.

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You don't need the front wheels on the ground. Keep them off the ground and steer with your turning brakes!!! :sha:

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smaller motor will solve the issue.....

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smaller motor will solve the issue.....

can I just pull a plug wire and see if that works first, before changing motors?

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Okay, solution, remove the seats, place the seats just behind the front beam, reengineer pedals, shifter, steering and turning brakes (probably wont need them), place a very large cooler in the cockpit, make sure that you use good harnesses and for Gods sake don't roll the buggy (don't wont to lose any beer)

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Okay, solution, remove the seats, place the seats just behind the front beam, reengineer pedals, shifter, steering and turning brakes (probably wont need them), place a very large cooler in the cockpit, make sure that you use good harnesses and for Gods sake don't roll the buggy (don't wont to lose any beer)

do I have to paint it black Tim? I like it air force blue, but you are showing it in black.

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smaller motor will solve the issue.....

can I just pull a plug wire and see if that works first, before changing motors?

Now where is the fun in that?? :1cheff:

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Move the battery to the front behind the beam, pick up a pair of heavy steel rims and replace the light weight aluminum rims. Note sell those rims on the board!

Two fairly inexpensive changes that should make a big difference!

Let us know how it works out

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John, another old buggy trick was to drill into the fron tubing, add melted lead,after you have determined how much weight you need, simply taking known weights and fixing to the same area.

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Old NASCAR trick

Put a egg under the gas pedal.

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Old NASCAR trick

Put a egg under the gas pedal.

yah, but I bet they didn't do that to their OWN cars!

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My dad had a short wheel base, around 90", iirc. He also had a 2.0l pinto. That car was a wheelie machine. One of my dads buddy's would drive up and down canal road doing wheelies dragging the skid plate. My dad didn't like it so much, as he went over backwards one afternoon in Otay. So he bolted a big 4"x4"x8" long, solid steel block to the front end. The front end would still get light going up hill, but never lifted big.

About 10 years ago he got brave and cut off the front end and added 12", and got rid of the pinto and went back to VW. Now the front end doesn't lift at all, but the car just pushes like crazy when turning.

Therefore adding to your front end is not the answer unless you move the seats forward and that will also mean your cage has to go as well.

I think you need to aim for a 100" wheel base with the seats set as close to the middle as possible.

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lots of weight in front of the beam and maybe a different rear tire...short wheelbase rear engine cars don't take much to pul the wheels easy

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Battery relocation is a pretty solid idea... 50 Lbs OFF the rear wheels and ON the fronts (net change 100) with almost no added weight.

Another thing to consider is extended trailing arms. Adding 3" to the arms will make a significant difference in weight dist. and also give you a plusher ride. Again, significant change with very little overall weight gain

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Battery relocation is a pretty solid idea... 50 Lbs OFF the rear wheels and ON the fronts (net change 100) with almost no added weight.

Another thing to consider is extended trailing arms. Adding 3" to the arms will make a significant difference in weight dist. and also give you a plusher ride. Again, significant change with very little overall weight gain

I had the same issue with my beam car, moving the battery does help. You could add a small ammo can up front for cheap or go with cooler mount/tool box up front if there is room and keep a small assortment of essential tools up there as well. If you move the battery, get a dry cell if you don't already have one for safety. The 3x3 arms is another great idea, just costs more for the arms, longer axles, and relocating the shock mounts.

Edited by 1tonfun

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Battery relocation is a pretty solid idea... 50 Lbs OFF the rear wheels and ON the fronts (net change 100) with almost no added weight.

Another thing to consider is extended trailing arms. Adding 3" to the arms will make a significant difference in weight dist. and also give you a plusher ride. Again, significant change with very little overall weight gain

I had the same issue with my beam car, moving the battery does help. You could add a small ammo can up front for cheap or go with cooler mount/tool box up front if there is room and keep a small assortment of essential tools up there as well. If you move the battery, get a dry cell if you don't already have one for safety. The 3x3 arms is another great idea, just costs more for the arms, longer axles, and relocating the shock mounts.

If width is tight, get a set of stock x 3 rear arms. Like said above, you will need new axles and shocks but the ride will be muck better.

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Not the cheapest, not the simplest, but by far, the most effective change will be lengthening the trailing arms.

If you are committed to keeping the buggy, Go for the arms first. you will see the biggest gains there. If you are still looking for more, move the battery and install an "ammo can trunk" up front. You should be satisfied with the results.

As Manx mentioned, width limitations can be important.

No limitations on width? you could even fit some 5x5 arms in there...

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