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Leaking Ass Bead Locks

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any one used slime or something like that to keep air in these mother effers angryfire.gif

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I have heard the preffered method is to use a gasket sealer along the inside and outside bead edge of the tire so the beadlock has a flat surface to clamp to. The bead surface area has small grooves to let the air escape when the are molding the tires. These grooves allow air to escape since the bead isn't sealed against a normal bead edge of the rim.

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From Mark Harms, former owner of STU........

Did you know tires are not designed to fit bead-locks?  Yep and that’s why some tend to leak. So this is the deal, as I understand it. Tires are made with a bead seat and that seat is where the tire is supposed to SEAL. Just about any tire you look inside of you’ll find some sort of textured surface. There are a number of finishes inside a tire that have names. Inside most tires made for Sand Tires Unlimited have a texture called a pebble finish. In other tires you might find lines or grooves inside the tire. Whatever the finish is they all have the same purpose and that is to bleed trapped air out from between the bladder and the inside of the tire during the manufacturing process. When air is trapped between the bladder and tire and can’t escape it pushes trough the tire during the manufacturing and now you have a bad tire.

The surface your asking the tire to SEAL on when we talk about a bead-lock isn’t smooth i.e. the inside. However, like many things in life, size matters and so does technique. Even though I never sold any bead-lock wheels I had to mess with a few. So using an old technique I used back in the 70’s, I brush some Aviation Gasket Sealer #3D (the brown stuff in a plastic jar with a brush that doesn’t harden) inside the tire. I would paint or brush about ¾ of an inch from what is called the lip down inside the tire all the way around and be generous with the stuff. This would fill all the nooks and crannies and create a good sealing surface for the bead-lock. Don’t let it dry, mount the tire while this goop is still wet. Two things happen when you do this, first you create a good seal and second (which speaks to Greg Halls comment) the wheel has a very, very hard time spinning on the tire when you throw major horsepower to the tire. Also while you’re at it paint or brush the inside bead seat (inboard) with respect to the wheel and this also helps to insure the wheel won’t spin in the tire. We performed this little technique on safety-beaded wheels for Top-fuel and Funny cars back in the 70’s long before the idea of a bead-lock came along. Cars then where making more horsepower than anybody playing in the dunes are today by far.

added a little more icon_wink.gif

Edited by porboy

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From Mark Harms, former owner of STU........

Did you know tires are not designed to fit bead-locks?  Yep and that’s why some tend to leak. So this is the deal, as I understand it. Tires are made with a bead seat and that seat is where the tire is supposed to SEAL. Just about any tire you look inside of you’ll find some sort of textured surface. There are a number of finishes inside a tire that have names. Inside most tires made for Sand Tires Unlimited have a texture called a pebble finish. In other tires you might find lines or grooves inside the tire. Whatever the finish is they all have the same purpose and that is to bleed trapped air out from between the bladder and the inside of the tire during the manufacturing process. When air is trapped between the bladder and tire and can’t escape it pushes trough the tire during the manufacturing and now you have a bad tire.

The surface your asking the tire to SEAL on when we talk about a bead-lock isn’t smooth i.e. the inside. However, like many things in life, size matters and so does technique. Even though I never sold any bead-lock wheels I had to mess with a few. So using an old technique I used back in the 70’s, I brush some Aviation Gasket Sealer #3D (the brown stuff in a plastic jar with a brush that doesn’t harden) inside the tire. I would paint or brush about ¾ of an inch from what is called the lip down inside the tire all the way around and be generous with the stuff. This would fill all the nooks and crannies and create a good sealing surface for the bead-lock. Don’t let it dry, mount the tire while this goop is still wet. Two things happen when you do this, first you create a good seal and second (which speaks to Greg Halls comment) the wheel has a very, very hard time spinning on the tire when you throw major horsepower to the tire. Also while you’re at it paint or brush the inside bead seat (inboard) with respect to the wheel and this also helps to insure the wheel won’t spin in the tire. We performed this little technique on safety-beaded wheels for Top-fuel and Funny cars back in the 70’s long before the idea of a bead-lock came along. Cars then where making more horsepower than anybody playing in the dunes are today by far.

added a little more icon_wink.gif

This good info to know!, but my OMF beadlocks haven`t leaked at bit in the 6 month`s that I`ve had them, do they start to leak over time, I haven`t lost air and have them at 8lbs and they keep holding?

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I think the OMF beadlocks are better than Douglas as far as holding air. It seems to me that they have more of a sealing surface than the Douglas beadlocks(wider beadlock ring). My douglas rims leak like a mo fo and my buddies OMF don't leak a bit. My unscientific observation.

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Spoodge it up brother ...1 1/2 qts of BERRYMAN Tire Seal and roll it beadlock side down

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dont forfet to retorque your beadlocks, they are supposed to be done after the first hour of driving,then every ten hours of driving, this is a common reason for the loss of air pressure as well.

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dont forfet to retorque your beadlocks, they are supposed to be done after the first hour of driving,then every ten hours of driving, this is a common reason for the loss of air pressure as well.

How many FT LB's

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We use a lot of Douglas beadlock wheels and almost all of them don't leak at all. The couple sets that have leaked we found out that the bolts on the beadlock ring were not tight enough.

But I do agree with using a tire sealant. It's good insurance against a leak.

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This is my favorite tire sealer method; and I've used it since 1996 with 100% great results. No leaks, no clumping after prolonged storage, no rim corrosion, washes out with water, and REALLY CHEAP!

(PER PADDLE)-- 1- 8oz bottle of Liquid Alumaseal Radiator Stop Leak, mixed with 15 ounces of regular Anti-Freeze (non- Dex),.. I use Peak brand.

You have to stir the Alumaseal with a screwdriver to get the stuff in the bottom of the bottle blended with the liquid. Then pour it into an old gear oil bottle along with the Anti-freeze, and use the gear oil spout tip with 6" of vinyl tubing to connect to your valve stem (core removed), then squeeze the bottle 'till empty. You HAVE to shake the bottle alot to keep the stop leak in suspension. Drive the car a mile or so and you're done.

I split 1 bottle between the 2 front tires.

My car will sit all summer, and the tires NEVER go flat!

I learned this trick from Grant George at Funco. icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

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Grant George learned it from an old desert dog while sitting on the side of a trail somewhere between Barstow and Lauphlin 20 or so years ago.

Edited by GRANT@FUNCO

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Thanksgiving weekend I must have ran over a stick because I had a hole in my paddle about the size of a small nail. I put a regular ol' can of Fix-A-Flat in the tire and it has been holding air since.

Edited by KingGlamis

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Thanksgiving weekend I must have ran over a stick because I had a hole in my paddle about the size of a small nail. I put a regular ol' can of Fix-A-Flat in the tire and it has been holding air since.

Fix A Flat's flat fixing capabilitie's tend to be short lived, and that stuff will corrode an aluminum rim like a mofo! I carry a corded rope plug tire kit for stick and nail holes, they work great.

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ive got 16.5 stu's on omf beadlocks and mine leak straight through the tire close to the bead. i thought it was through the bead until i washed it and i could see little air bubbles coming straight through the tire.

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This is my favorite tire sealer method; and I've used it since 1996 with 100% great results. No leaks, no clumping after prolonged storage, no rim corrosion, washes out with water, and REALLY CHEAP!

(PER PADDLE)-- 1- 8oz bottle of Liquid Alumaseal Radiator Stop Leak, mixed with 15 ounces of regular Anti-Freeze (non- Dex),.. I use Peak brand.

You have to stir the Alumaseal with a screwdriver to get the stuff in the bottom of the bottle blended with the liquid. Then pour it into an old gear oil bottle along with the Anti-freeze, and use the gear oil spout tip with 6" of vinyl tubing to connect to your valve stem (core removed), then squeeze the bottle 'till empty. You HAVE to shake the bottle alot to keep the stop leak in suspension. Drive the car a mile or so and you're done.

I split 1 bottle between the 2 front tires.

My car will sit all summer, and the tires NEVER go flat!

I learned this trick from Grant George at Funco. icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

Who would have thunk it blink.gif What the hell does the antifreeze don? Crazy what the creative mind will come up with.

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The antifreeze acts as a suspension agent for the sealer. If you think about it, your radiator is aluminum like your rims, and your tires are rubber like your radiator hoses, so the sealing method basically works the same for both.

Without this stuff in my tires, they used to bleed air through the sidewalls.

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The antifreeze acts as a suspension agent for the sealer. If you think about it, your radiator is aluminum like your rims, and your tires are rubber like your radiator hoses, so the sealing method basically works the same for both.

Without this stuff in my tires, they used to bleed air through the sidewalls.

im gonna have to try this....what do i do? fill up my tires with radiator fluid? laughing.gif ....be like a tractor!!

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Anyone use TUBES?

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I noticed that in your title for this thread, you complained of a leaking ass as well as beadlocks. Lots of advice on the beadlocks, how come nobody has stepped up with a cure for your leaking ass?

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too much hot sauce angryfire.gif

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You can buy a can of Bead Seal from any place that sells tire supplys Like County Motor Parts (Napa) I used it works great!

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i have the douglas beadlocks w 33 blasters and havnt lost a lb in 4 months i guess lucky so far

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I noticed that in your title for this thread, you complained of a leaking ass as well as beadlocks. Lots of advice on the beadlocks, how come nobody has stepped up with a cure for your leaking ass?

A good butt plug from your local sex shop should cure your leaking ass. laughing.giflaughing.giflaughing.gif

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Anyone use TUBES?

Don't ever put a tube in a sand tire. Makes it too stiff. Pet milk will stop the tire leak, will also work in your radiator.

LATER DON~~~

Edited by donparscale

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The smell of condensed (Pet) milk when you take off that tire later will make you puke! 25barf.gif25barf.gif

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