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HozayKwarvo

4 deep cycle battery connection

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Quick question as I know a lot of folks have done this - currently have two 6v batts in series on the rig and looking to add two more. Assuming you just have two pairs (in series) and parallel the pairs, is that correct? Anything else? Any extra protection, relays, anything at all? Seems too simple and wanted a sanity check before I burn it to the ground (...see what I did there? :lol: ) thanks! 

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The simple part (series parallel) is correct. A circuit breaker, or disconnect switch, wouldn't hurt.

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41 minutes ago, Kraut_n_Rice said:

The simple part (series parallel) is correct. A circuit breaker, or disconnect switch, wouldn't hurt.

Should have clarified. Already have a disconnect in line and the standard breakers that are in place. Wasn’t sure if anything above and the existing circuit is needed.

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Here is the way I did mine. DON~~~

4 batteries 001.jpg

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2 hours ago, HozayKwarvo said:

Should have clarified. Already have a disconnect in line and the standard breakers that are in place. Wasn’t sure if anything above and the existing circuit is needed.

I'd just add more batteries then.

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It's that simple. Wire pairs of them in series to make a 12v set, then wire the 12v sets in parallel, as many as you have. Make sure to use nice thick cable with tinned, crimped connectors and adhesive lined heat shrink to keep corrosion out of the cables.

What's equally important is to properly charge them, or you're not really getting the benefit of all of those batteries. Go to the mfr's website and find out what the proper absorption voltage is for that model of battery. Let's say for example that they say to charge at 7.4v per battery until current drops to less than 1A. Since you have them in series, that would be 14.8v. If your charger is set to 14.2 or 14.4v, then you're only charging the batteries to about 80 or 85% of full capacity. Since you shouldn't discharge your batteries below 50% cap. (12.0v at rest), reducing the charge down to 80% for example, reduces your usable cap. by 40%! Meaning instead of getting the full 50% usable cap., you're only getting 30% usable. Kind of a waste of money to buy 4 batteries and not get the full benefit out of them.

Check your charger and set it to the battery mfr recommended voltage. If your charger doesn't allow changing the voltage or changing battery type to control charging voltage, you might consider buying a better charger, or solar panels with a controller that allows full control of the charge voltage.

 

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54 minutes ago, socaldmax said:

It's that simple. Wire pairs of them in series to make a 12v set, then wire the 12v sets in parallel, as many as you have. Make sure to use nice thick cable with tinned, crimped connectors and adhesive lined heat shrink to keep corrosion out of the cables.

What's equally important is to properly charge them, or you're not really getting the benefit of all of those batteries. Go to the mfr's website and find out what the proper absorption voltage is for that model of battery. Let's say for example that they say to charge at 7.4v per battery until current drops to less than 1A. Since you have them in series, that would be 14.8v. If your charger is set to 14.2 or 14.4v, then you're only charging the batteries to about 80 or 85% of full capacity. Since you shouldn't discharge your batteries below 50% cap. (12.0v at rest), reducing the charge down to 80% for example, reduces your usable cap. by 40%! Meaning instead of getting the full 50% usable cap., you're only getting 30% usable. Kind of a waste of money to buy 4 batteries and not get the full benefit out of them.

Check your charger and set it to the battery mfr recommended voltage. If your charger doesn't allow changing the voltage or changing battery type to control charging voltage, you might consider buying a better charger, or solar panels with a controller that allows full control of the charge voltage.

 

Good stuff. I’ll have to see what they are charging at when plugged in and see if the regulator is adjustable. What we are looking at has a 160w solar system on it, would be hoping to add more panels and not sure what the limits of the built in system are - if it’s adjustable or not, will get the model number and check into it for sure. 

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1 hour ago, HozayKwarvo said:

Good stuff. I’ll have to see what they are charging at when plugged in and see if the regulator is adjustable. What we are looking at has a 160w solar system on it, would be hoping to add more panels and not sure what the limits of the built in system are - if it’s adjustable or not, will get the model number and check into it for sure. 

The solar system is a great addition! The solar controller and battery charger can work together to charge the batteries up to the setpoint of the battery charger, then the solar controller can continue to fully charge the batteries if there's enough panels and sunlight to do so. Check on the model of solar controller and let me know, some of these units installed at dealers are "Go Power!" and they're total junk. They have a high markup and low performance. Any unit that is PWM controlled (like "Go Power!") should be replaced with an MPPT controller. They produce 25-30% more power from the same solar input power.

You could add a 200w panel for a total of 360w, install a 20A MPPT controller and produce enough power to power all 12VDC loads, fully charge your batteries and run an ice maker from morning to night, providing about 20 lbs of free ice per day. 

If you already have an MPPT 20A or greater solar controller, all you need to do is add another panel (if you choose) and set the correct charging voltage. With a 160w panel, you should be seeing 7-9A of charging for most of the day on a sunny day. With another 200w of solar, you should see about 20-22A of charging.

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On 6/3/2018 at 6:07 PM, socaldmax said:

The solar system is a great addition! The solar controller and battery charger can work together to charge the batteries up to the setpoint of the battery charger, then the solar controller can continue to fully charge the batteries if there's enough panels and sunlight to do so. Check on the model of solar controller and let me know, some of these units installed at dealers are "Go Power!" and they're total junk. They have a high markup and low performance. Any unit that is PWM controlled (like "Go Power!") should be replaced with an MPPT controller. They produce 25-30% more power from the same solar input power.

You could add a 200w panel for a total of 360w, install a 20A MPPT controller and produce enough power to power all 12VDC loads, fully charge your batteries and run an ice maker from morning to night, providing about 20 lbs of free ice per day. 

If you already have an MPPT 20A or greater solar controller, all you need to do is add another panel (if you choose) and set the correct charging voltage. With a 160w panel, you should be seeing 7-9A of charging for most of the day on a sunny day. With another 200w of solar, you should see about 20-22A of charging.

PM sent  - seeking input on my enclosed trailer solar project.

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