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Dunerking

Does anyone here know this guy?

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13 hours ago, punkur67 said:

I sold my Bounder last year and did a couple hour walk through showing the buyer every switch, feature, and function. Also had every manual tabbed in a 3 ring binder to make looking anything up extremely easy. Guy called me about 20 times the first month. 

"How do you turn the porch light on"

"Where is the dipstick"

"What kind of oil did you use"

"When should I do generator maintenance "

And so on 

@POULE43   ????

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You guys crack me up, so quick to judge and criticize. Bottom line is he had the opportunity to inspect before buying As Is, no warranty implied or given. Buyer beware. 

Text the crybaby and tell him you reported his written threats (Idiot) tho the police, and you are willing to press charges.

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I'd file a restraining order against this guy as well as a police report listing the threats, he will then be notified.

If that doesn't work then call Gueto :bangin:

Edited by GROPER

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46 minutes ago, ladsm said:

@POULE43   ????

Who Me!!!! :lol:

Too Funney!!!

 

:poule:

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What is his complaint and what does he want you to do about it? 

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I stand corrected, but my 'data' was based on what I was told a long long time ago. I had thought the law was that you could record if you were one of the parties on the call. It's always been illegal to be a 3rd party recording 2 other peoples conversation. So, that being said, I stand corrected. I guess, all you have to do is inform the other party at the beginning of the call and then you're good.

California Recording Law

Note: This page covers information specific to California. For general information concerning the use of recording devices see the Recording Phone Calls, Conversations, Meetings and Hearings section of this guide.

California Wiretapping Law

California's wiretapping law is a "two-party consent" law. California makes it a crime to record or eavesdrop on any confidential communication, including a private conversation or telephone call, without the consent of all parties to the conversation. See Cal. Penal Code § 632. The statute applies to "confidential communications" -- i.e., conversations in which one of the parties has an objectively reasonable expectation that no one is listening in or overhearing the conversation. See Flanagan v. Flanagan, 41 P.3d 575, 576-77, 578-82 (Cal. 2002).  A California appellate court has ruled that this statute applies to the use of hidden video cameras to record conversations as well. See California v. Gibbons, 215 Cal. App. 3d 1204 (Cal Ct. App. 1989).

If you are recording someone without their knowledge in a public or semi-public place like a street or restaurant, the person whom you're recording may or may not have "an objectively reasonable expectation that no one is listening in or overhearing the conversation," and the reasonableness of the expectation would depend on the particular factual circumstances.  Therefore, you cannot necessarily assume that you are in the clear simply because you are in a public place.  

If you are operating in California, you should always get the consent of all parties before recording any conversation that common sense tells you might be "private" or "confidential." In addition to subjecting you to criminal prosecution, violating the California wiretapping law can expose you to a civil lawsuit for damages by an injured party. See Cal. Penal Code § 637.2.

Consult The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press's Can We Tape?: California for more information on California wiretapping law.

California Law on Recordin

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13 hours ago, Legit Duner said:

I've been through this with my business. It's 100% Illegal to record a call without the other sides consent in California. It's not admissible in court.

That's good info., Legit. I'm not an attorney & I don't stay at Holiday Inn, but it looks like Californian's privacy is covered when making phone threats.

The Supreme Court of Google says:

[When it comes to recording telephone calls and other private conversations, California is a “two-party consent” state. Under the California Invasion of Privacy Act and in particular Penal Code section 632, all parties to the conversation (even if there are more than two) must give their permission or else recording it will be illegal. This applies to plain old eavesdropping, too.

Section 632.7 contains an important distinction from Section 632.  Under Section 632.7, it is illegal to record conversations where one or both parties to the call are on a cellular or cordless telephone.  More importantly, Section 632.7 does not have a confidentiality requirement; it is prohibited to record or eavesdrop on any cellular or cordless telephone call without providing a warning.]

Now, I'm thinking leaving a threat or an implied threat via text message or voice mail might get you in some trouble.

I hope this issue gets resolved amicably.

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I wonder how the big corp. get away with recording your conversation when you call them. They certainly aren't asking for your permission.

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"This call may be recorded for quality assurance."

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3 minutes ago, socaldmax said:

I wonder how the big corp. get away with recording your conversation when you call them. They certainly aren't asking for your permission.

They notify you at the beginning of the call. Continuing with the call is consent enough, it appears. 

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4 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

They notify you at the beginning of the call. Continuing with the call is consent enough, it appears. 

I guess so. Seems odd college kids need a written contract to kiss a girl or have sex, but big corporations just need to tell you they're recording their CSRs boning you. 

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4 minutes ago, socaldmax said:

I guess so. Seems odd college kids need a written contract to kiss a girl or have sex, but big corporations just need to tell you they're recording their CSRs boning you. 

College dude isn’t worth gazillions and is probably a punkass anyway. :bigrin 

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7 hours ago, Legit Duner said:

I'm surprised. Was it a criminal investigation? They probably had prior authorization?

I had a 10k "issue" that would have been easily avoided if my recording was admissable. 

There are at least three laws in California barring it. Even if you live in a state that allows it, you can't record a convo of a Californian without permission.

1 year in jail, 5k fine

Could have been.  the "solution" from the police was to record all of the calls & if he did not stop, press charges with the legally obtained evidence.

 

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On 11/8/2018 at 2:36 PM, HozayKwarvo said:

Sprint??? Do you still have AOL dialup too? :lol: 

IMG_4600.PNG

 

Typical Sprint, 2 bars of reception!!!!

Back page was always a good place to put peoples phone##

Edited by Wash 10 Crew

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