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evantwheeler

Shocks Leaking Badly with Minimal Use After Rebuild?

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3 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

Just redid the injectors on my Jeep. Tore an o-ring installing it. Turned the ignition on, good fuel pressure, no leaks. Decided to wait until 5 minutes into my test drive to start pissing fuel onto the exhaust manifold. No fire, but definitely had the heart rate up. 

Point is, they don’t always leak right away. :bigrin 

I have a similar story...  ;)

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4 minutes ago, Kraut_n_Rice said:

I have a similar story...  ;)

i just hope it didnt end like polaris says it " a unintended thermal event"  the pressures in a shock are alot higher during use just starting with 150 psi nitrogen charge then the added pressure of the spring on rebound i would be real curious to know the actual pressures inside a shock in thinking the would be north of 1000 psi 

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16 minutes ago, Kraut_n_Rice said:

I have a similar story...  ;)

Did yours also end with it running like shit with “upgraded” injectors?

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3 hours ago, evantwheeler said:

Ok.  So next question is who do I spend the money with to fix these issues?  Go straight to Fox?  

Call and see what they say. They're in San Diego.

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I fought one of my shocks. I rebuilt it twice and it kept leaking. I finally swapped the shaft and fixed it. I could not see any damage on the shaft but it was the problem. 

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Check the inside of the can where the retaining ring sets for nicks, scratches or sharp edges. This area has to be completely smooth. It easy to nick an O ring when putting it back together.  KDM Shocks in Oxnard has done a great job with my car.

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36 minutes ago, punkur67 said:

I fought one of my shocks. I rebuilt it twice and it kept leaking. I finally swapped the shaft and fixed it. I could not see any damage on the shaft but it was the problem. 

What led you to decide on replacing the shaft, was it just the last thing left to replace, or did you mic it and find it was out of tolerance?

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2 minutes ago, evantwheeler said:

What led you to decide on replacing the shaft, was it just the last thing left to replace, or did you mic it and find it was out of tolerance?

Just the last thing to replace. I rebuilt the other 7 shocks and had no issues. Just had one that would not seal.

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Only issues of leaking shocks I’ve had were worn out shafts and seal heads.

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Maybe they did not replace any of the O-rings. Don't think for a minute that everyone does things correctly or honestly in every instance, reputable or not. 

I've had my 4 year old Fox shocks apart for valving changes a half dozen times at least and I have not yet replaced any seals. They are all dry as can be. 

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Just now, fortyfour said:

Maybe they did not replace any of the O-rings. Don't think for a minute that everyone does things correctly or honestly in every instance, reputable or not. 

I've had my 4 year old Fox shocks apart for valving changes a half dozen times at least and I have not yet replaced any seals. They are all dry as can be. 

It's possible.  I paid for a rebuild, not just an oil change.  Time to learn how to rebuild my own shocks.  

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6 hours ago, evantwheeler said:

I did not check these specifically.  I know my coilovers were charged because I adjusted the pressures slightly based on input from a buddy with the same car. 

How would nitrogen pressure affect the leak?  Wouldn't they leak MORE if properly charged?  

No, but it is possible that they could and will leak if undercharged.. 

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1 minute ago, SCHMIDTY said:

No, but it is possible that they could and will leak if undercharged.. 

And since its a sealed system, the more fluid that is lost, the more undercharged they become and its a never ending circle of fluid and pressure loss until all is lost....

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4 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Just redid the injectors on my Jeep. Tore an o-ring installing it. Turned the ignition on, good fuel pressure, no leaks. Decided to wait until 5 minutes into my test drive to start pissing fuel onto the exhaust manifold. No fire, but definitely had the heart rate up. 

Point is, they don’t always leak right away. :bigrin 

I had the exact same experience with an injector o-ring. The o-ring lasted about 5 minutes, but fortunately I had not started driving yet, I was still parked when I noticed the start of the leak.

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Posted (edited)

I have rebuilt shocks for a long time. And for some big names. I only do it for a few people still not to make a profit.

make sure the seals are coming from the manufacture, some seal kits are cheap china crap that’s why they are a quarter of the cost. 

The picture of the top cap leaking and you saying there are several shocks leaking tells me 2 things, cheap thin oil, and cheap seals.

that top cap O-rings isn’t usually replaced when rebuilding and if it was you would see heat marks where a torch was used to melt the lock tight. Since I’m 99% sure that seal wasn’t changed I’m going to go with cheap thin oil with wrong additives possibly a little detergent that has destroyed your o rings. There are a lot of people in the shock game now that know little about shocks but are mechanically inclines enough to rebuild them. You can only make so much labor per shock so the only way to turn a profit is to get cheaper materials.

if you don’t know your shock builder personally and know he uses factory parts make sure to supply the shock builder with parts and oil. This happens all too often. Sorry you got burned but it’s going to be costly now. Drop them off fox or if you need help let me know. I’m only saying this because these O-rings will  it come in a rebuild kit. You can order from Fox.

 

 

 

9195523C-4F50-4543-A35B-A0F5CBF215A8.jpeg

Edited by CHRIS J

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I'd recommend Kevin at Dialed Shock Prep. He is in Fullerton

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I've only had mine rebuilt twice in 7 years...I've never had a leak and it sits all summer long.  I had ORW just put seals and oil in them the first time..no issues.  They are a Fox dealer and use Fox parts.  The last time I had the valving changed so I had Mirage do them.  They've been in there for three season now and no leaks.  Mirage does good work...but  they are not cheap.

 

~jw

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Do your self a favor and learn to rebuild them.  @SCHMIDTY sells a great filling kit.  The rest of the tools you can buy online.  If you going to be in the offroad game its a worthy investment.  The cost of the tools is going to be pretty close to the cost to pay someone to do the work for you.

I had one that was leaking like that.  It had micro scratches / pitting on the shaft.  It would be fine until it sat.  I replaced the shaft and its was dryer then a nuns #$%% after that.

My oil looks like shit after 2 hard dune seasons.  I rebuild mine and put fresh oil in.  There is a noticeable difference every time.  Mine are getting completely torn down for cerakote this next time so I have to heat them up to remove the caps and replace my crossover rings also.  While I am in there I am also changing over to the AGM suspension sliders to keep from eating my shock bodys.  Sand is tough on this stuff.

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12 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Did yours also end with it running like shit with “upgraded” injectors?

I've honestly only put maybe 100 miles on it since, but they seem to be fine.

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5 hours ago, r3meyer said:

Do your self a favor and learn to rebuild them.  @SCHMIDTY sells a great filling kit.  The rest of the tools you can buy online.  If you going to be in the offroad game its a worthy investment.  The cost of the tools is going to be pretty close to the cost to pay someone to do the work for you.

I had one that was leaking like that.  It had micro scratches / pitting on the shaft.  It would be fine until it sat.  I replaced the shaft and its was dryer then a nuns #$%% after that.

My oil looks like shit after 2 hard dune seasons.  I rebuild mine and put fresh oil in.  There is a noticeable difference every time.  Mine are getting completely torn down for cerakote this next time so I have to heat them up to remove the caps and replace my crossover rings also.  While I am in there I am also changing over to the AGM suspension sliders to keep from eating my shock bodys.  Sand is tough on this stuff.

We sell the seal kits, spanner wrenches, seal bullets, Lucas oil , and also the aforementioned nitrogen fill tools and regulator kits to be able to service fox an d king shocks as well as many others as well.

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Also Fox oil is red or blue. Blue being the older oil. 

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8 hours ago, r3meyer said:

Do your self a favor and learn to rebuild them.  @SCHMIDTY sells a great filling kit.  The rest of the tools you can buy online.  If you going to be in the offroad game its a worthy investment.  The cost of the tools is going to be pretty close to the cost to pay someone to do the work for you.

I had one that was leaking like that.  It had micro scratches / pitting on the shaft.  It would be fine until it sat.  I replaced the shaft and its was dryer then a nuns #$%% after that.

My oil looks like shit after 2 hard dune seasons.  I rebuild mine and put fresh oil in.  There is a noticeable difference every time.  Mine are getting completely torn down for cerakote this next time so I have to heat them up to remove the caps and replace my crossover rings also.  While I am in there I am also changing over to the AGM suspension sliders to keep from eating my shock bodys.  Sand is tough on this stuff.

I switched from the King oil to Amsoil synthetic. Lasts much longer and the car works better.  I run the light number 5.  https://www.amsoil.com/lit/databulletins/g1663.pdf

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, r3meyer said:

 While I am in there I am also changing over to the AGM suspension sliders to keep from eating my shock bodys.  Sand is tough on this stuff.

Are you using the plastic ones or the billet aluminum ones?

Edit:

My bad.  I see now the plastic is an insert into the billed aluminum housing.

Edited by evantwheeler

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Punchdrunk Monkey said:

Also Fox oil is red or blue. Blue being the older oil. 

Fox Blue is 5wt, Red is 7.5. It is crap oil.. It leaves a sticky residue, which is not a great attribute for shocks. King oil is very low  quality also & gets dirty very quickly ,( which is your shocks wearing) . I use sell, and recommend Lucas synthetic,  as with the anti-friction additives that they put in the oil, it stays cleaner longer, and the shocks run 25-30* cooler; all of which equates into longer service intervals and longer shock life.  It is hands down far and away better than either King or Fox oil.  And we sell it by the gallon or 1/2 gallon in either 5, 7.5, or 10 wt. 

Edited by SCHMIDTY

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for all the advice.  I'm going to have to have my bypasses rebuilt again, likely with new shafts this time and both top caps need to come off as they are both weeping.  

Thanks to Race Dezert, I found a much better permanent solution (I f*ing hope so) to my shock problem:

 

IMG_1048.jpg

IMG_1050.jpg

IMG_1051.jpg

 

Need to do a a little adjusting to the mouting points of the top of the coilovers with some weld washers, but it should be easy fab.   These are going to give me the look I want and also perform better at 3.5" w/ 5 tubes vs. the 3.0" with 4.  Definitely overkill, but I couldn't pass up the deal.  Got some 3.0" fronts as well to replace my 2.5's, but that will wait until the summer as I think I'm going to have to have new top arms made to clear all the tubes.  

Edited by evantwheeler

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