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Busy busy at the Uhaul store.

I asked the little clerk, "WTF? They leaving California"?

She says, yup,  Arizona, Texas, and Washington state.

Always calling for more trucks and cardboard boxes.

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The price to rent a uhaul from Ca to where ever is 2X the amount than the people coming to CA.  

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All the smart people who have been raised here like myself are leaving. All the idiots are moving in. 

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 I’m not leaving so I’m not smart, but I was raised here. 

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My Father in law works for a moving company and says they have never been so busy moving people out of California. Moving people in...not so much!  

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Posted (edited)

The flight of the middle class. 

Forgot to add businesses. I know of 3 going to Tennesse.. 

Edited by SANDPSYCHO

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We Moved out of Cali ( born and raised) a few weeks ago after years of planning, I knew i hated it there but didn't realize how much until we actually left. Do not even want to visit,   We used a U pack trailer and it was expensive.

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Not sure where I would move to if we did....

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25 minutes ago, CRUSTY said:

Not sure where I would move to if we did....

With your kids starting High School I don't see you going anyplace anytime soon.....

But I can predict what state you will end up in.

 

 

 

 

 

You are going to end up in whatever state your first Grand-baby lives in. Guaranteed 

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6 minutes ago, MWB said:

With your kids starting High School I don't see you going anyplace anytime soon.....

But I can predict what state you will end up in.

You are going to end up in whatever state your first Grand-baby lives in. Guaranteed 

It Won't be AZ  :321:

 

Seriously though...It's a conversation that we have had. Almost all are now in HS, so the count down is real.

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2 hours ago, B0NES said:

All the smart people who have been raised here like myself are leaving. All the idiots (people looking for a job) are moving in. 

Fixed

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6 minutes ago, CRUSTY said:

It Won't be AZ  :321:

 

Seriously though...It's a conversation that we have had. Almost all are now in HS, so the count down is real.

That first little peanut moves to anyplace, Mrs Crusty will be saying I got to be close and by close I want to be able to drive there and home same day no problem.

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Three New Census Bureau Products Show Domestic Migration at Regional, State, and County Levels

KRISTIN KERNS AND L. SLAGAN LOCKLEAR
 
 | 
 
APRIL 29, 2019
 

 

The South experienced a net population gain from movers coming in from other regions of the United States.

Florida received the most movers from other states.

Los Angeles County had the highest number of people moving out, but also had the highest number moving in.

 

 

 

Movers to and from the South make up the largest domestic migration flows at the regional level.

 

 

 

These are just a few of the highlights in three recently released U.S. Census Bureau data products on migration at different geographic levels. Migration or geographic mobility refers to the movement of people from one location of residence to another.

Movers to and from the South make up the largest domestic migration flows at the regional level. Many especially large flows at the state and county levels are in the South or in the West. Some of the largest state- and county-level flows are to or from Florida, California or Arizona.

 

 

Net Migration, Flows and Mover Rates by Region

 

The 2018 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (CPS ASEC) migration tables provide estimates for net migration, flows and mover rates by region. In 2018, 10.1 percent of people (about 32.4 million) in the United States moved within the past year. Historical tables and historical graphs show some of the CPS ASEC migration data over time.

  • Net Migration. The South continued a pattern of net population gains from domestic migration. The region experienced statistically significant net gains from domestic migration most years since 1981.

In 2018, about 1.2 million people moved to the South from another region, while only about 714,000 moved from the South to another region. This resulted in a net gain of about 512,000 people. If movers from abroad are included, the net gain from migration to the South is about 959,000 people.

  • Flows. There are 12 region-to-region migration flows and the five largest in 2018 were either to the South or out of the South.

 

 

 

The South drew about 412,000 people from the Northeast, 356,000 from the Midwest, and 459,000 from the West. The region lost about 317,000 to the West and 276,000 to the Midwest.

The South to Midwest flow does not differ statistically from the Midwest to South or South to West flows, and the Northeast to South, Midwest to South, West to South, and South to West flows do not differ statistically.

The remaining seven region-to-region flows range from about 54,000 to 162,000 people.

  • Mover Rates. The Northeast had the lowest overall mover rate in 2018, at 7.7 percent. The other three regions do not differ statistically from one another, at 10.4 percent for the Midwest, 10.8 percent for the South, and 10.7 percent for the West.

Compared to the 2018 overall national mover rate of 10.1 percent, the Northeast mover rate is lower, the South and West mover rates are both higher, and the Midwest mover rate does not differ statistically.

 

 

State-to-State Migration Flows

 

The 2017 American Community Survey (ACS) state-to-state migration flows tableprovides estimates of the number of people in the United States moving between geographies within the past year. These geographies include the 50 states and District of Columbia and abroad (including Puerto Rico).

  • Moving to Florida. Florida had the most domestic inmovers, with 566,476 people moving from another state within the past year. The states with the next highest inmigration flows are Texas with 524,511 and California with 523,131. Texas and California do not differ statistically.

New York contributed the most to Florida’s inflow with 63,722 people moving from New York to Florida. This flow is between regions, from the Northeast to the South. The second-highest contributor was Georgia with 38,800 inmovers.

  • Leaving California. California had the most domestic outmovers, with 661,026 people moving to another state within the past year.

The states with the next highest outmigration flows are Texas with 467,338 outmovers, New York with 452,580, and Florida with 447,586. Texas, New York and Florida do not differ statistically.

 

moves-from-south-west-dominate-recent-migration-flows-graph-1
 

 

Among the five states that received the most outmovers from California, several are adjacent to California or nearby: Texas (63,174 outmovers), Arizona (59,233), Washington (52,484), Oregon (50,109) and Nevada (47,513).

Texas and Washington do not differ statistically from Arizona, and Washington, Oregon, and Nevada do not differ statistically from each other. The flow from California to Texas is between regions, from the West to the South.

 

 

County-to-County Migration Flows

 

The Census Bureau also produces migration flows at the county level using the ACS five-year data. Estimates for these smaller geographies are based on a pooled five-year ACS sample rather than a single year.

The 2012-2016 county-to-county flows tables provide estimates of the number of people in the United States moving within a one-year period between geographies, including counties and county equivalents (counties), minor civil divisions (MCDs) and abroad. The Census FlowsMapper tool provides visualizations of these county-to-county data.

  • County Inflows. Los Angeles County, Calif., had the highest inmigration flow, with 214,577 people moving from a different county within the past year.

After Los Angeles County, Maricopa County, Ariz. (179,178 inmovers), and Harris County, Texas (175,286), had the next highest inmigration flows, and Cook County, Ill. (138,356 inmovers), had the fourth-highest inmigration flow. Maricopa County and Harris County do not differ statistically.

Six other counties among the highest inmigration flows are: San Diego County, Calif. (120,330); Dallas County, Texas (117,129); Riverside County, Calif. (114,215); King County, Wash. (112,922); Orange County, Calif. (111,942); and San Bernardino County, Calif. (111,139).

Dallas County does not differ statistically from San Diego, Riverside, King and Orange Counties, and Riverside, King, Orange and San Bernardino Counties do not differ statistically.

Counties with high numbers of county-to-county inmigrants generally draw people from a wide geographic range.

For example, the data include inflows to Maricopa County from 1,016 different counties in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, a higher count than any other county. This represents about 32 percent of the 3,142 counties in the United States.

The data also include inflows to Los Angeles County from 828 counties and inflows to Harris County from 793.

  • County Outflows. Los Angeles County had the highest outmigration flow, with 312,000 people moving to a different county within the past year.

After Los Angeles County, Cook County (213,732 outmovers) had the second-highest outmigration flow, and Harris County (168,936) had the third-highest outmigration flow.

Seven other counties among the 10 with the highest outmigration flows are: San Diego County (152,475); Maricopa County (151,829); Dallas County (134,843); New York County, N.Y. (124,624); Kings County, N.Y. (123,101); Orange County (122,940); and King County (106,990).

San Diego and Maricopa Counties do not differ statistically, and New York, Kings and Orange Counties do not differ statistically from each other.

Similar to inmigration, counties with high numbers of county-to-county outmigrants generally send people to a wide geographic range.

For example, the data include outflows from Maricopa County to 1,228 different counties, a higher count than any other sending county. This represents about 39 percent of the 3,142 counties in the United States.

The data also include outflows from Cook County to 1,118 different counties, Harris County to 1,037, San Diego County to 1,031, and Los Angeles County to 1,108.

 

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Posted (edited)

The highly educated are moving in, not so educated moving out.

GOT A COLLEGE DEGREE? WELCOME TO CALIFORNIA

Domestic migration by educational attainment for adults 25 and older in 2017:

 
 
First Figure: Leaving California
Second Figure: Coming here
 
H.S. dropout
29,800
19,440
H.S. grad
76,384
45,333
Some college
118,050
74,968
Bachelor's degree
104,695
102,093
Graduate degree
71,975
80,756
Edited by ahipara 55

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28 minutes ago, ahipara 55 said:

The highly educated are moving in, not so educated moving out.

GOT A COLLEGE DEGREE? WELCOME TO CALIFORNIA

Domestic migration by educational attainment for adults 25 and older in 2017:

 
 
First Figure: Leaving California
Second Figure: Coming here
 
H.S. dropout
29,800
19,440
H.S. grad
76,384
45,333
Some college
118,050
74,968
Bachelor's degree
104,695
102,093
Graduate degree
71,975
80,756

Interesting stats.   If you have a minimum wage job or slightly above and can get the same wages in a cheaper state why would a person stay.    

 

 

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Looks to me like the academia elite are coming in and the blue collars are leaving. 

 

Guess who is gonna be doing all the work work?  (((The vastly uneducated newcomers who came for the free healthcare.)))

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3 hours ago, B0NES said:

 I’m not leaving so I’m not smart, but I was raised here. 

Same here, my wife wants to leave so bad, her friend moved to tn and says its great (wonder how she feels now in summer). Why should i leave for sister kissin country with giant bugs, make the assholes leave

 

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19 minutes ago, Sand Shark said:

Interesting stats.   If you have a minimum wage job or slightly above and can get the same wages in a cheaper state why would a person stay.    

 

 

No. Texas, where most are moving to, has a minimum wage of $7.50. The money stays in California, unfortunately.

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One year till my youngest graduates High School.   Already bought the house in AZ for cash.   Using this year to get it furnished nice and then estate sale all my old used stuff heare and get in the car and be home.   Registering the truck, boat and RZR next week in AZ.

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7 minutes ago, RayClay said:

Looks to me like the academia elite are coming in and the blue collars are leaving. 

 

Guess who is gonna be doing all the work work?  (((The vastly uneducated newcomers who came for the free healthcare.)))

They are the ones driving up R.E. values in Silicon Valley area. I just just got back from a motorcycle trip in Northern California. Riding back home through Bay area then Silicon Valley wrere rough. You think traffic is bad here?

Far Northen California is not a place you want to live either. Very sparsly populated but the citizens are mostly undesireable. I could not live there. weed growing EVERYWHERE outside the city centers.

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, sausage450r said:

Same here, my wife wants to leave so bad, her friend moved to tn and says its great (wonder how she feels now in summer). Why should i leave for sister kissin country with giant bugs, make the assholes leave

 

I WISH that were the case. My wife does not want to leave. I'm ready. Certainly not Tennessee.

When we do eventually leave, I will retain all my real estate as rental income is my retirement.

Edited by ahipara 55

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20 minutes ago, sausage450r said:

make the aholes leave

 

Ahh then this place would be nice and empty 😂

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I'm on the list of people leaving.

Selling the business to my partner and outta here!

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Been here for close to 25 years. Wife was raised in Bellflower. My daughter has one year left in HS, and we are out of here!! Taking our business's with us.. I have been craiglisting like crazy getting rid of stuff I don't really need or want to have to move.. Honestly now that we have decided to get out, it can't happen fast enough.

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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, ahipara 55 said:

No. Texas, where most are moving to, has a minimum wage of $7.50. The money stays in California, unfortunately.

Sister in law moved to Texas when she re-married.  She hates it and so does my niece.  They live in a nice area outside of San Antonio.   Nice place to visit, but I have no desire to leave in that state.  

If you get away from the Los Angeles and Bay area California does not feel as overpopulated.  Have a co-worker that is basically retiring and he is moving from Los Angeles area up to Paseo Robles ares.  He is tired of the traffic and congestion.

I do not know how anyone lives in the Bay area.  Beautiful place, but San Francisco has turned into a shit hole.  

Edited by Sand Shark

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