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tjZ06

RZR Basic Maintenance: clean and inspect your clutches and more...

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Posted (edited)

Let me start by saying I pretty well failed to get a decent number of pics, so this is going to be a word-heavy (even by my standards) post. If you don't own a SxS, particularly a RZR and/or don't do your own maintenance on it you probably want to just click "back" now.

The last time I washed Melissa's 2018 XPT Fox Edition I noticed a little clutch "issue" during my usual dry-off run (I use filtered water so I just blow the water off and let it air dry). I went for a short ride, and right away pinned it. Around 60 MPH the RPM jumped and it felt like it stopped pulling, so I instantly backed off. I thought I broke the belt, but I still had compression braking going on. I gently got back on it and everything was fine. I turned around and made another pull and had the same result. Finally, I made one last pull and got up to about 87 MPH perfectly fine before I had to back out as I was catching up to traffic (I TOTALLY wasn't doing this on a public road, of course).

So, first off I'm a big dumb-dumb and didn't follow one of the cardinal rules of CVT SxSs: let the belt warm up before you start hammering on it. Like I said, by the third pull it seemed fine. Still, it bothered me enough I figured I'd pull the cover and inspect things and clean it up and put a fresh belt on. I don't think this belt has a ton of miles on it, probably 500-ish of the 716 total on the RZR (yeah, I changed the first one way early because I'm just like that). However, maybe 100 miles of that was towing things out in Glamis, including out from the dunes all the way down by test in Gordon's up to RRE.

Like I said, I didn't take a ton of pics, sorry. Obviously the first step is removing the clutch cover (with dune season done the cover was back on for dirt riding). If you haven't removed your clutch cover before, well you should. I tell everybody that gets a SxS the first thing they need to do is practice changing a belt so they know exactly what they're doing if/when they have to do it on the trail or in the dunes. So, if you've read this far and haven't taken your cover off, go ahead and check out Youtube, there are a zillion videos for changing a belt on a RZR.

With the cover off I inspected the belt and both clutches. Really, I didn't see anything obviously wrong, nor was it even that dirty. On the belt you're looking to see if it's highly glazed, or if you start to see the "cords" coming out. Obviously if you see chunks missing or anything like that then it's for sure bad, but I don't think you ever really see that before it goes unless you got super lucky. If the belt is really old, or has seen a lot of heat you should also try to look down in the "valleys" between the ridges on both the inside and outside of the belt for signs of cracking. In my case nothing looked out of the ordinary.

Next I took off the clutches themselves. Again, there are a zillion Youtube videos on this. I like to leave the belt on when I pop the primary since it can go flying and the belt helps to retain it. The process is simple...

Use an impact to remove the primary clutch bolt (the primary, aka the "drive" clutch is the clutch mounted to the crankshaft of the engine, the one on the left if you're looking straight at them from the driver's side of the RZR). Make sure you keep any washers/spacers in order, I like to just leave them on the bolt as they came off, and if it's your first time or you might not remember the order when you kick the bolt sitting on the floor and the washers fly everywhere, take a picture of it!

Next you thread the clutch removal tool into the primary. You'll notice the threads are in a different spot on the puller vs. the primary bolt. The idea is that the puller threads into the body of the primary itself, then just bottoms out against the snout of the crankshaft. When you tighten it down it pushes the primary off. Conversely, the bolt is meant to retain the primary, so it threads into the crank itself. You do NOT need the spacer(s) or washer(s) on the puller, since it's threading into the primary itself.

The primary is often tough, and doesn't want to "pop" free. Some grease on the threads of the puller helps. I like dry-lube because we found it worked just as good when pulling my brother-in-law's primary at River Rest Resort and it doesn't leave behind a sticky mess that will attract clutch-dust and dirt later. I had a freshly charged battery on my 20V Dewalt impact and out first the clutch wouldn't pop. But stopping for a second and hitting it again we could see the puller was still rotating, even if just barely.

After a few minutes of that it finally popped free. This is one of those procedures where you'll find 1 guy that says don't use an impact, it's too hard on things. Yet, for every guy that says don't use an impact you'll find 99999999999999999999 people that always use an impact and have no issues. Even most of the videos from clutch kit companies and the like show them using an impact. Really, I've known some SxS racers and clutch gurus and I've never seen one guy that DOESN'T use an impact. But, if you want to you can use a big ole breaker bar. It's up to you. If you can't get the primary to pop off there are lots of tricks out there on Youtube. One thing I will say: don't go crazy hitting the primary with a big mallet, one you could damage the clutch itself, but more importantly you have to remember the primary is sitting on the crank snout, so you're hammering against your main bearings while no oil is flowing.

However you get it loose, once it's free just pull the primary off with the belt. Once the primary is off, you're best bet is to take it outside and blow it out really well. In fact, your best bet is to blow out the whole clutch assembly as soon as you get the cover off, before you start taking things apart (and you should do this every so often as routine maintenance). From there I had a neat little primary holding fixture to mount it in a bench vice.

1_Clutch.thumb.jpg.528eb91de6b61759c4db8b294ff2ffaf.jpg

The primary fixture is the round thing with the all-thread sticking out. It's a little hard to tell from the picture, but on the back-side of the round part it has flats for putting it in the vice. The top side obviously receives the vanes of the back of the primary's stationary sheave, and the all-thread goes through the whole primary while the knurled nut tightens down to hold it.
 

It looks something like this:

2_Clutch.thumb.jpg.684b71d968541fd0548e646d0a58a315.jpg

(no, those aren't all my tools - that's usually my gun workbench and some of my gun tools, the rest are in a specific roll-around, my automotive tools are in a big box opposite this bench)

Next, to remove the secondary you once again just run the bolt out with an impact. NOTE: if you're just doing the secondary but leaving the primary, remove your belt before you do this, otherwise the secondary is under tension and will pop out at you (ask LRS). When you remove the bolt, once again keep track of washers and spacers. If you have an XP Turbo that is stock, there will be a snap-ring that comes off next, with more washers behind it. If you're staying stock, make sure you keep track of all of those parts and their order. In my case the snap-ring had been eliminated when the Aftermarket Assassins clutch kit was installed, so no snap-ring to worry about.

At this point, the two sheaves of the secondary can slide off individually. However, the whole unit ins balanced so you want to put them back together the same way they came apart. I totally forgot this, so we pulled the outer sheave without marking things. Luckily the two sheave halves can only go together 3 ways (this will make more sense later) and only one of those ways would line-up the witness marks on the inner-sheave with the holes for the belt-removal tool on the outer sheave. Still, you should be smarter than me and mark the two halves. Also, remember brake clean will take sharpie marks away very quickly.

Once you have the secondary sheaves marked, you just pull them off (you can pull them together, or one at a time, it doesn't matter). Again, I'd take 'em outside and blow 'em out the best you can before you even start disassembly and inspection. I didn't, and just made a mess of my workbench w/ clutch dust and whatnot.

Now that you have both clutches on the bench, it's time to start cleaning and inspecting. I used some brake clean to blast 'em all out. I did a bunch of research, as you often hear different stories about brake clean ruining things. There are a few people that say not to let brake clean hit the buttons, sliders and various plastic parts. Well, if you're actually going to get the clutch dust out, that's impossible. For every 1 person who says brake clean can hurt things there are 342529564285028452095842 people who say they've been going to town with it for years and had no problems.

I took the secondary sheaves out one at a time, and blasted it out good. On the inner sheave make sure to get into whole helix assembly on the backside (that side that faces the trans). For the primary we took the cover/spider cover (whatever you want to call it) off, along with the primary spring before cleaning. With the cover and spring removed you can move the clutch in and out easily and get everything clean. Also, this frees the weights up so you can swing them and make sure they move very freely and feel on their contact surface for any wear, grooves, flat-spots etc. Usually a flat-spotted weight is what causes RZR primaries to stick engaged so it won't freewheel (very common on XP 1000s). Obviously I cleaned the cover and spring separately as well.

One note here: when you remove the spider cover, you want to be very sure it comes up slowly and evenly. They do make some jigs to hold it down while you pull the bolts. I suppose on the fixture I have all you'd need would be a big washer that goes out wider than the spider nut. However, as-is my fixture does not hold the cover down. So the best thing to do is to leave 2, roughly opposing bolts tight and run the rest out. Then slowly, alternating back and forth, remove the last two bolts making sure the cover comes up nice and even. There is a bushing inside the cover that you don't want to damage by letting it go all crooked.

Once you've generally cleaned the clutches, give everything a thorough inspection. On mine, I was pleasantly surprised by very little wear on almost everying... almost. This was with 716 total miles, probably 500+ of which were in Glamis with no clutch cover.

However, there were one set of sliders with significant wear. These are the sliders inside the outer secondary sheave:

3_Clutch.thumb.jpg.5fdd96bc83c6e439d6e924d547fbce14.jpg

4_Clutch.thumb.jpg.48ffbe7f895c3669bdb6857e756e5ae6.jpg

(NOTE: now it probably makes sense that the two sheaves can only go together in one of three ways)



Luckily I had purchased a complete new secondary to keep in the trailer as a spare. We robbed the sliders off of that, and put them on my current secondary. Why not just install the brand new secondary? Well, one I'd need to swap the Aftermarket Assassins helix and spring into the new one. No big deal, I have the tools for it, but just not part of the plans for the day. But mostly, I wanted to keep the brand new secondary "brand new" and swap it on along with the brand new primary closer to 2-2.5k miles (moving the clutch-kit parts across at that time, or replacing them as need-be). Everything else about the secondary looked great, so it wasn't time to relegate it to a spare just yet.

Pulling the sliders off the new secondary and moving them over to the old one (we used a tiny dab of blue locktite on the bolts):

5_Clutch.thumb.jpg.7e948aa2bcff6b71a91c55a6d04b63ce.jpg

Now that the parts replacing was done, it was time to clean the sheave surfaces. Again, going back to internet wisdom, "they" say brake clean leaves a residue on parts and you don't want that residue on the surfaces the belt rides on (the faces of the sheaves). I suppose I believe it, since there are different brake clean formulas for when you're going to weld on the surface afterwards or not, so the reaction between the residue and the welding gasses doesn't cause poisonous gas (it's true, look it up).

The racers I've known say to use to clean the sheaves is some scotch-brite and denatured alcohol. So that's what I used. You want to wipe mostly along the radius of the sheaves, not the circumference. In other words, make the light scrubbing marks go inside to outside, not around the sheave. The pics make the scratches look way more prominent than they are, in reality you can't even feel them. The main goal here is to get the sheaves 110% clean and get all the old belt residue off, while putting a very light grain on the surface that will have a little bite as it breaks in. It's similar to the idea of final-honing cylinder bores.

The pics make the clutches, especially the secondary look "pitted" but I promise you it wasn't, or I would have thrown the brand new one on. Most of these pics were before the final wipe-down with just a ling-free rag and the alcohol (I didn't stop to take pics after that step, since I wanted to get them back on the RZR at that point).

6_Clutch.thumb.jpg.451fc672faa2401b0594ca1da4f08ef4.jpg

7_Clutch.thumb.jpg.96e25bc363bba1a5bed21deaca4423f7.jpg

Old vs. New. NOTE: if you look in the "slots" of the inner secondary sheave where those worn-out sliders ride, I also used the alcohol and scotch-brite to clean those out, being careful not to leave any actual grooves.

8_Clutch.thumb.jpg.8985e5d08a93d7599a14884a8f3dbf95.jpg

9_Clutch.thumb.jpg.d0c56cd06d0791cdcb404e26328af575.jpg

Next we cleaned the primary sheaves the same way. This is where having the spider cover and spring out are handy so you can open the clutch up and get to everything. You also want to clean anything on the one-way bearing you see in between the sheaves with a rag and alcohol only, NO scotch-brite. On the flip-side, when you close the primary down you want to clean all the crap that's accumulated on the surface where the clutch slides back and forth.

10_Clutch.thumb.jpg.7e791370277cbb5afee9dee1dda2a393.jpg

This pic is only after the initial brake clean spray-off. But it lets you see the helix and such inside the inner secondary sheave.

11_Clutch.thumb.jpg.d872bc80a558ca906eb83ac4412bcf8d.jpg

Here's a pic with the clutches off, before I cleaned up. You can see some of the crap that fell out of the clutches when hitting them with the impact to pull them. I cleaned up the whole area inside the cover, including the crank-snout and the input shaft of the trans (the crank snout being the shorter stub on the left, the input of the trans being the longer shaft on the right). IMPORTANT NOTE: on earlier RZRs the 3 bolts you see around the crank snout in the area that is behind the primary are known to be loose from the factory and back-out. It seems like Polaris has fixed this problem, but I went ahead and checked all 3. All 3 were tight, so I left well-enough alone. Still, some like to pull them out and Lock-tite them. 
12_Clutch.thumb.jpg.039f2c35163ac6ccdfefe8a3ba2062c2.jpg

All clean, and back together with a fresh belt. After this you just need to re-install the cover and the breather tube. I drove the RZR around the block some in both Low and High and made sure everything was functioning well. Unfortunately I couldn't really stand on it to reproduce the issue I was having previously because it's a fresh belt and also freshly cleaned sheaves that need to have a chance to break in and embed some belt material in the sheaves.

While I had the RZR in the garage I also changed the oil, checked the front diff fluid level, checked the trans fluid level, attempted to change the air filter (Evo sent me the wrong part, so I'll have to actually change it this weekend), and hit the grease fittings. While trying to find the driveshaft fitting I noticed some wires hanging in the the driveshaft tunnel towards the front of the RZR and just touching the driveshaft. I'll pull the skid plate this weekend and zip-tie them up, and grease the driveshaft while I have the skid plate down.

 

-TJ

 

 

Edited by tjZ06

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I mentioned Evo had sent me the wrong air filter, here's what I mean:

1_Filter.thumb.jpg.57c93ff9358bf544f5caf4a42762457a.jpg

2_Filter.thumb.jpg.b3a612045f0434ad4cacabf29b67b267.jpg

^^OEM XPT Filter^^

 

3_Filter.thumb.jpg.e0dce3b909bc5e7d40067e5dac6f7f07.jpg

4_Filter.thumb.jpg.ec3347343aee121ef8ad22abafe45c95.jpg

^^The first filter Evo sent me^^

 

5_Filter.thumb.jpg.4927610edce2ffb3c997fef730bde4a4.jpg

^^The new Evo filter on the left (correct size), and the first filter Evo sent me on the right (wrong size)^^

But, why does this matter? Well, normally I'd be all for a little more surface area on a filter. However, the lid of the RZR air box looks like this:

6_Filter.thumb.jpg.4f0b2b7207899abae81f869789043c3a.jpg

You're looking at the inside of it, that raised area on the right side sits at the end of the filter and holds it onto the intake. If you look back at the factory air filter, you'll notice there's no clamp on it. I don't much care for that design. The Evo filters come with a clamp, which I much prefer. However, the first one was too long to let the airbox lid close, because that stand-off was hitting the filter.

New filter on and clamped down:

7_Filter.thumb.jpg.08d87484e3dc26411be691c318c5b3c4.jpg

 

Another reason this type of maintenance is beneficial, when I noticed a clamp on one of the boost tubes that had been in contact with the frame and snapped.  I replaced and re-positioned it, but I'll keep an eye on it. 

-TJ

 

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The last thing I still needed to do on the XPT was zip-tie up some of intercom wires in the driveshaft tunnel. It's one of those things I noticed when poking around looking for grease fitting on the driveshaft a few weekends ago, and just didn't mess with at the time.

Speaking of the grease fitting, I was ASSuming it was something you could find w/o taking anything apart, and the owner's manual does it make it super-obvious where it is. Here's a pic of how the owner's manual shows it:

1_Grease.jpg.6043a528def5578409ead0213f0717db.jpg

2_Grease.jpg.9666d73c369262fbd617e9732ad3c779.jpg

In the first pic I was thinking what I was seeing was the front diff or something at the end of the driveshaft. With the Service Manual it's super-obvious that it's actually the carrier bearing you're seeing, and the grease-point is up under the skid-plate.

I went ahead and put the RZR up on my poor-boy lift...

1_Lift.thumb.jpg.aa79bffed319c2d3a4ea4f2f7d671026.jpg

...and dropped the skid-plate. I didn't really get a pic of that, but it's a simple operation with about a dozen 8-mil bolts with large washers. Polaris was kind enough to make the main skid-plate tuck up under the plated section of the front frame under the front diff, so it holds it up until you slide it back. That made it easy to remove all the bolts but one at the back of the plate, then remove that last one while just holding the plate, set the gun down, and slide the plate back lowering it down with both hands (and just as easy to do in reverse putting it back up).

Once I got that off, I could see the issue pretty clearly.

1_Wires.thumb.jpg.a25bfd05b6db3e8456e8d325e6463145.jpg

Here you can see that a) even though I clean the snot out of this thing, it still stays nice 'n dirty up above the skid plate b) where the driveshaft has been rubbed-clean by the wires (the section that is clean with marks going around the circumference... the part in front of that which looks more like it's wiped clean was me feeling around for the lube-point... which is actually on the OTHER side of the carrier bearing, which is what you see at the left hand side of the pic).

2_Wires.thumb.jpg.80f897dc7d6d942c12333ac8bbda1b2d.jpg

3_Wires.thumb.jpg.64f46cf1cdc52e45159fcc7b6179f118.jpg

Another angle.

3_1_Wires.thumb.jpg.a833a019fbe31b78b227692239ec9672.jpg

3_2_Wires.thumb.jpg.1ebe02c444144ccc0d56b374530c66a2.jpg

Unfortunately I futzed with the wires a bit before I got the first pic. So, here you can see the wires in question aren't resting on the driveshaft, but you can see how they're hanging loosely next to it ("behind" it in the angle of this pic) and clearly could make contact.

Looking around I wasn't seeing much good to zip-tie them off too. The coolant lines for the radiator and the heat exchanger run in the tunnel too, so it's pretty hard to get your hands in there, and I didn't want to tie-off to hot coolant lines. The plastic piece above everything is the "center console" so you don't want to tie to that in case you ever want to pull it. Luckily I found a metal bracket for the console I was able to get a zip-tie around to make a big loop, then get a tie around the wires and tighten both up to take care of it.

4_Wires.thumb.jpg.5604bd854224adbc06ab6301cbfda7d8.jpg

6_Wires.thumb.jpg.82e4dd917a8bc78a55527a404763693f.jpg

You can also see my carrier bearing is still looking fine, and I put a hand on the DS and wiggled it around and there wasn't an unacceptable amount of slop in it.

7_Wires.thumb.jpg.dfddab05ba4c19184af7a6b30cf649c6.jpg

-TJ

 

 

 

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On 8/29/2019 at 3:05 PM, tjZ06 said:

Another reason this type of maintenance is beneficial, when I noticed a clamp on one of the boost tubes that had been in contact with the frame and snapped.  I replaced and re-positioned it, but I'll keep an eye on it. 

Do you have any pictures of that you could share please?

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1 hour ago, raptorflash said:

Do you have any pictures of that you could share please?

I don't think I got one, actually.  That said, it wasn't factory, I have Evo boost tubes and intake elbow and stuff.  

 

-TJ
 

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Nice post!

That slider did not last very long.  How many miles are on the clutches?

 

 

Edited by Sand Shark

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15 hours ago, Sand Shark said:

Nice post!

That slider did not last very long.  How many miles are on the clutches?

 

 

It was around around 700 miles when I did that maintenance.  Probably 500 of those miles were in Glamis with the clutch cover off, running hard with groups like this: 

20190330_085605.thumb.jpg.b8584c902a1258ff4d450be3d58a2680.jpg

20190330_085215.thumb.jpg.fe68171e368d5ca58f370de5d09baf33.jpg

Left to right: this same '18 XPT Fox Edition  -   E85 Twin Turbo LS3 Funco Gen6  -  4.0L Whipple supercharged big-cube LS3 Tatum 2-seat  -  4.0L Whipple supercharged big-cube LS3 2-seat Alumicraft.  All of the rails have great drivers who spend a ton of time in G and dune hard.  

I also probably had 50+ miles of towing/recovering people in G last season too.  

So yes, I'd say the wear on the sliders is a bit premature and dissapointing, but all-in all it was about $45 of parts (yes, those little things are about $15/ea) to fix.  Just changing these sliders in the future (vs. a full maintenance and cleaning like this) would be very simple too.  It'd just require taking the belt off, taking the secondary bolt out, sliding the outer secondary sheave off, changing the sliders, and put it back together.  

 

-TJ
 

Edited by tjZ06

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Man awesome!

Another reason why you should NOT hesitate buying anything from TJ...he' goes through is stuff meticulously.

I love the Poor Man lift...I think I could do that!

:lmao:

:cheers:

 

 

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BTW...your garage looks killer!

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5 minutes ago, dbart said:

Man awesome!

Another reason why you should NOT hesitate buying anything from TJ...he' goes through is stuff meticulously.

I love the Poor Man lift...I think I could do that!

:lmao:

:cheers:

 

 

I might be slightly insane about my offroad toys.  Melissa always wonders why I wash them every trip when we're just going to get them dirty again.  I mean, she's not wrong. ;) And for SxSs the poor man lift is great.  They're not going to work great for any regular car though... but I don't have much wrenchin' to do on those.  One day I'll upgrade to one of these: https://www.quickjack.com/ and setup wall brackets to hang them out of the way. 

4 minutes ago, dbart said:

BTW...your garage looks killer!

Thanks!  It's just a little 3-car tandem, I still "need" a little more property and a shop someday, but this does the trick for now. 

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1 hour ago, tjZ06 said:

I also probably had 50+ miles of towing/recovering people in G last season too.  

-TJ
 

You only towed me once for like 300 yards...

image_8898.jpg

image_8899.jpg

Nice that Nick and @BansheeBoy914 got some pics. Even an aerial shot while it was on the tow strap.

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True... but I bet you were the heaviest tow.  Vegas Steve gets credit for probably 90% of my towing miles between his Bullet and RZR.  I towed the RZR all the way from the dunes just East/North of Test at Gordon's all the way back to RRE.  And I towed his Bullet like 3 times that same weekend.  

 

-TJ

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6 minutes ago, tjZ06 said:

True... but I bet you were the heaviest tow. 

-TJ

It's 2019 bro. Body shaming isn't cool.

 

Glad you did this thread. I don't read the SxS forum often but your tech threads are always full of so much great information.

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9 minutes ago, L.R.S. said:

True... but I bet you were the heaviest tow. 

-TJ

 

9 minutes ago, L.R.S. said:

It's 2019 bro. Body shaming isn't cool.

 

Glad you did this thread. I don't read the SxS forum often but your tech threads are always full of so much great information.

I was just going to say is he calling you fat ?  

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34 minutes ago, hondajimz said:

 

I was just going to say is he calling you fat ?  

I believe he is. 

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Here is what I have done with my RZR’s.

Every summer:

Change all oils, grease all fittings, check all hubs, give a good once over

Every trip:

Clean air cleaner, inspect belt, blow out clutches and housing, exercise the clutch as if to remove the belt, check all fluids.

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12 hours ago, dbart said:

BTW...your garage looks killer!

BTW did I mention I added AC to the garage?

 

-TJ

 

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10 hours ago, L.R.S. said:

I believe he is. 

I'm the last one to call the kettle black...

-TJ

 

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20 hours ago, tjZ06 said:

It was around around 700 miles when I did that maintenance.  Probably 500 of those miles were in Glamis with the clutch cover off, running hard with groups like this: 

20190330_085605.thumb.jpg.b8584c902a1258ff4d450be3d58a2680.jpg

20190330_085215.thumb.jpg.fe68171e368d5ca58f370de5d09baf33.jpg

Left to right: this same '18 XPT Fox Edition  -   E85 Twin Turbo LS3 Funco Gen6  -  4.0L Whipple supercharged big-cube LS3 Tatum 2-seat  -  4.0L Whipple supercharged big-cube LS3 2-seat Alumicraft.  All of the rails have great drivers who spend a ton of time in G and dune hard.  

I also probably had 50+ miles of towing/recovering people in G last season too.  

So yes, I'd say the wear on the sliders is a bit premature and dissapointing, but all-in all it was about $45 of parts (yes, those little things are about $15/ea) to fix.  Just changing these sliders in the future (vs. a full maintenance and cleaning like this) would be very simple too.  It'd just require taking the belt off, taking the secondary bolt out, sliding the outer secondary sheave off, changing the sliders, and put it back together.  

 

-TJ
 

Nice rails. 

700 miles is not much.  Are those sliders wearing early a common issued on the Turbo XP?   Perhaps running the clutch cover would give them more life.  

I blow my clutches out after every trip.  Did the same on my XP1000.   I actually have to pull my clutches on my X3 and inspect and replace any items that are worn.  With 4000 miles on them it is time. 

Edited by Sand Shark

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Nice write up. Do you remember what weights you ended up with for your clutch kit? I saw you started at 3-3-1 I think?

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3 hours ago, Sand Shark said:

Nice rails. 

700 miles is not much.  Are those sliders wearing early a common issued on the Turbo XP?   Perhaps running the clutch cover would give them more life.  

I blow my clutches out after every trip.  Did the same on my XP1000.   I actually have to pull my clutches on my X3 and inspect and replace any items that are worn.  With 4000 miles on them it is time. 

Yeah, 700 isn't a ton but they also weren't done yet.  I'm sure there was another 700+ in those sliders, but I was in there so I just replaced 'em. 

50 minutes ago, raptorflash said:

Nice write up. Do you remember what weights you ended up with for your clutch kit? I saw you started at 3-3-1 I think?

Yup, 3-3-1 and honestly it's been spot-on.  The Aftermarket Assassins helix is key.  

 

-TJ

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On ‎9‎/‎6‎/‎2019 at 12:36 PM, tjZ06 said:

It was around around 700 miles when I did that maintenance.  Probably 500 of those miles were in Glamis with the clutch cover off, running hard with groups like this: 

20190330_085605.thumb.jpg.b8584c902a1258ff4d450be3d58a2680.jpg

20190330_085215.thumb.jpg.fe68171e368d5ca58f370de5d09baf33.jpg

Left to right: this same '18 XPT Fox Edition  -   E85 Twin Turbo LS3 Funco Gen6  -  4.0L Whipple supercharged big-cube LS3 Tatum 2-seat  -  4.0L Whipple supercharged big-cube LS3 2-seat Alumicraft.  All of the rails have great drivers who spend a ton of time in G and dune hard.  

I also probably had 50+ miles of towing/recovering people in G last season too.  

So yes, I'd say the wear on the sliders is a bit premature and dissapointing, but all-in all it was about $45 of parts (yes, those little things are about $15/ea) to fix.  Just changing these sliders in the future (vs. a full maintenance and cleaning like this) would be very simple too.  It'd just require taking the belt off, taking the secondary bolt out, sliding the outer secondary sheave off, changing the sliders, and put it back together.  

 

-TJ
 

This thread makes me realize 2 things:

1- I miss early morning dune rides with the boys and breakfast beers by the flagpole

2- I neglect my poor rzr

:cheers: 

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3 hours ago, Tatum&Honda4thewin said:

1- I miss early morning dune rides with the boys and breakfast beers by the flagpole

So. Much. Truth.

 

-TJ

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That Alumi-Craft is one of my all time favorite cars!

:drool:

 

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17 hours ago, dbart said:

That Alumi-Craft is one of my all time favorite cars!

:drool:

 

Meeeeeeeeeeeee too.  When I had the Potter and we'd park it next to Nick's AC it was obvious where Potter gets most of his ideas, which was fine by me! 

 

-TJ
 

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