Jump to content

downhillin1

Members
  • Content Count

    706
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About downhillin1

  • Rank
    Dune Master
  • Birthday 05/24/1973

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Location
    Locating....... [87% complete. please wait....]

Previous Fields

  • Campsite
    Wherever I am when I drop camp
  1. Is it the bolt type or allen type??? Eithe way, drill a small hhole accross the head and use some safety wire.
  2. sIngle carb and yes it is built for blow through
  3. I have a 1915 Blow through that starts and idles great... In forst gear it stammers when driving. Once i get into second and get on it it gets a bit better and in third it runs pretty good. Is there some sort of FAQ somewhere that will help me in tuning this thing? Anybody have any ideas of where to start on getting this thing in top form?
  4. Funny, i was think'n just the oposite of this! If danny boy does NOT like it, it has to be a good thing for us!!! Like hozy said, you really would need to see all the details, but if the open deserts are declared national parks, you can bet we will be thrown out for sure!!! I worry about the being thrown out part but also see the good in having the cash to take care of things. It sounds like a catch 22. Heres the money that everyone needs for their individual interests but you all have to get out to get the funds. Damned if you do and damed if you dont.
  5. Its a bit tough to decipher but From the quick glancing over of the ARTICLE I am interested in seeing this bill. Looks like it could go either way.
  6. Long Read.... Technicality may cut California desert areas from federally protected status Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times Larry Blaine, right, outdoor recreation planner for the Barstow office of the Bureau of Land Management, guides brothers Mike Pfeifer, not pictured, of Crestline and Dan Pfeifer of Newport Beach as they explore “Spooky Cave” in Afton Canyon Natural Area. Congress is considering a national landscape conservation system similar to the national parks system that would protect 26 million acres across the West. But most of the sweeping 11-million-acre California Desert Conservation Area is not included, puzzling environmentalists and public land managers in the state. Afton Canyon, considered the “Grand Canyon of the Mojave,” is about 45 minutes east of Barstow. The proposed National Landscape Conservation Act would unify management and funding of designated areas. But it requires 'national' in the area name, excluding some of the state's sensitive areas. By Janet Wilson, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer March 13, 2008 Congress is considering permanent protection for 26 million acres of beautiful and historic landscapes in the American West, but has quietly excluded millions of acres of California desert. In a system that would rival the national parks and forests, the National Landscape Conservation Act would unify the management and funding for areas such as the original Pony Express National Historic Trail, Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, a million acres of Alaskan caribou calving grounds, 38 wild rivers, Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and a tiny ghost town near the Mexican border. But more than half of the 10.6 million-acre California Desert Conservation Area, which stretches from the Mexican border to Mono Lake, has been dropped on technical grounds. Because the word "national" isn't in its title, the conservation area doesn't qualify, according to U.S. Bureau of Land Management attorneys. Environmental watchdogs and some land bureau employees say the California area, created by Congress in 1976, is the cornerstone of the fledgling national system. They say the semantics hide political motives: Utility companies have proposed hundreds of miles of electrical transmission corridors through California's deserts, and off-road vehicle enthusiasts oppose further regulation of the area. "I don't think this is a technicality at all . . . That's a huge hit to desert conservation in California and the Southwest," said Daniel Patterson, director of the southwest office of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, which represents whistle-blowers in government agencies. The bill does include the King Range National Conservation Area, the Headwaters Forest Reserve, the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument, and just under half -- 3.7 million acres -- of the desert conservation area. Not included are more than 6 million acres of desert. Some of the land has been used for mining and off-roading, but much of it remains pristine, wide-open space. Patterson said that if the bureau's entire California desert system isn't part of the national system, its conservation designation "would be a protection in name only . . . The California BLM will lose funding, they will lose staff, they'll lose what conservation focus they might have." He said the excluded desert lands, including visually stunning and ecologically important areas such as Afton Canyon and Big Morongo Preserve, would be more at risk from proposed transmission-line corridors, among other projects. In addition, he said, "it could be expanded to off-roading, it could be expanded to mining, it could be expanded to land sales for Southern California urban housing sprawl. It's just a loss." Others were relieved that major portions of the desert would not come under tighter rules. "I'm worried about the people who own private land (inside the conservation area), the off-highway users, the ranchers, the miners, the loggers . . . the recreation access to people who just like to go collect rocks," said Chuck Cushman, head of the American Land Rights Assn. "When you put an overlay of national park-like regulations over these lands, you just cut off Americans from those lands." Although staff members for U.S. Rep. Mary Bono (R- Palm Springs) say she is reluctant to amend the House bill to include the California land, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said she will push to fix the 7-milllion-acre "glitch" in the Senate version. In many cases, bureau land is open to multiple uses, including mining, grazing and off-road driving. There are no guided tours and few rangers. Officials said that management approach would remain on the national landscape lands. "There is hunting. There will be no hotels. You can camp pretty much anywhere you want," said Elena Daly, head of the bureau's program that could win permanent protection from Congress. She said the program also stresses collaboration with local communities, including "sustainable ranching." Daniel Pfiefer of Costa Mesa is torn by the proposed legislation. Pfiefer, who had just finished a three-day off-road trip along the ancient Mojave trail this week, said he appreciates the difference between national park and land bureau conservation lands. "We came through some national parks areas. You cannot get off any road at all. You can't even have a ground fire in national parks . . . But the BLM areas are very friendly. They don't want you driving out all over the place, it's a 'tread softly' kind of thing. I'm very happy with the way it is right now." Although he hates the way rogue off-roaders "trash" pristine areas by cutting illegal paths and dumping garbage, the bill proposed by Congress, he said, makes him nervous. "As a person that absolutely hates rules and regulations myself, I have such a difficult time with it, because I do so much love the outdoors, and I do so much love going out and Jeeping across the trails. "Being an off-roading enthusiast, it scares me to think that if the federal government starts putting their fingers into it, and start sectioning off any portions of the desert, then closing it off is not far behind." The national landscape conservation system was created in 2000 by outgoing Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt to pull together and protect hundreds of conservation areas, monuments, wilderness study areas and other "orphans" of the federal bureau. All of the bureau's California desert lands were included. Unlike the proposed law, Babbit's executive order can be rescinded by the current or future Interior secretary. "A constant threat is that it could be dissolved and dismantled at any point in time, with the many properties truly becoming 'orphans,' " Ian Wilson, spokesman for the nonprofit Sonoran Institute, a Tucson-based environmental policy group, said about California's desert area. Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne supports the bill as written. A broad coalition of more than 70 outdoor sports, environmental, historical preservation and religious groups is pushing for passage of the legislation, which would also establish a line item in the federal budget for annual funding. Currently the program receives $50 million a year. "I think we are all about to witness the next major conservation system for the United States," said Daly on a recent tour of several program sites, including the Las Cienegas National Conservation Area grasslands that stretch for 48,000 acres outside of Tucson. It is hard to see the difference on the ground between some of the included and excluded areas. The Las Cienegas area is named for the Hundred Waters creek that flows across the Sonoran desert floor between mountain ranges in the Sky Island region, its willow and cottonwood-lined banks providing shade and forage for 230 bird species. " Oklahoma" and "Red River" were filmed on the sweeping grasslands decades ago, and ranchers and land bureau managers have laboriously ripped out invasive mesquite that is overtaking the grasses. Five hundred miles to the west, the Mojave River bubbles up out of the parched desert in Afton Canyon, nourishing more than 180 bird species. Hundreds of films, including "Letters From Iwo Jima," and "Kill Bill" were filmed in the desert area. Daly says it's not her job to tell Congress whether some or all of California's deserts should be included. But she said it's not too late for the omitted lands to be added, if that's what Congress wants. "The bill is in draft form," she said. "It's not a done deal." LA TIMES
  7. Autozone sells them in three packs for a couple dollars
  8. If you run the spring all the way down you will lose travel from the spring stacking up. Best bet would be to find a reputable suspension shop for ATVs and have the shock re-builr for your weight and riding style. The springs will need to be changed and the valving will need to be redone. Depending on your riding style they will also change the oil in that shock. Different weights I believe. One other thing... Dont crank down on the the adjuster on the resivior to much. What you think may stiffen the shock will also blow the seals prematurely if you go to far with it.
  9. http://www.glamisdunes.com/invision/index....howtopic=116396
  10. www.Whittierdailynews.com Caltech tries unearthing sand secret By Elise Kleeman Staff Writer PASADENA - In about 30 of the world's deserts, the shifting sands create a booming noise that has baffled scientists for decades. Early explorers imagined the strange rumbling sounds - roughly an octave and a half below middle C - as the cries of a buried horseman, or the bells of an underground convent. Others have described it as the sound of musical instruments, or the drone of an airplane. Exactly how it happens, though, has long been a mystery. "It's a really remarkable and weird phenomenon," said Christopher Brennen, a Caltech mechanical engineer. "When sand squeaks, we call that chirping: for example, when you walk along dry sand at the beach. But the booming of these dunes is different." With ground-penetrating technology, cobbled- together sampling tools and some help from the seat of their pants, Brennen and his colleagues believe they have found the key to the sand's deep voice. They have been studying the rare singing sands at two nearby dune fields: Kelso Dunes in Mojave National Preserve, and Dumont Dunes 30 miles north of Baker. One requirement for their music, the researchers have long known, is for the sand to be on the move. This can happen naturally -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Advertisement -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- as winds pile sand up one face of the dune until it avalanches down the other. But to make the desert boom on command, the researchers have adopted a decidedly unprofessional-looking technique: climbing to the dune peak hundreds of feet above the desert floor and scooting down on their behinds. If conditions are right, the result is the same. "You can feel it vibrate through your fingers and your toes when you stand," Brennen said. French scientists had theorized that the booming was caused by scores of similarly sized sand grains rubbing together as they rolled. The bigger the sand grains, they believed, the lower the sound. But samples that the Caltech team collected showed that that hypothesis "didn't really make sense," said mechanical engineer Melany Hunt. "That's not what we think happens on the sand dune," she said. "The frequency that we hear ... really is determined by the characteristics of the dune itself, not just by the grain sizes." Hunt compared the dunes to her daughter's cello. "In the cello, you're strumming the string but it's the whole instrument that's vibrating," she said. "We think it's similar in the dune." The breakthrough for the Caltech team came when they used ground-penetrating radar and other imaging techniques to spy on what was happening beneath the desert surface. They found that although sound travels slowly through the top layer of sand in the dune, "when you go down to a depth of six feet, you find there is kind of a hard layer that has a much higher speed sound," Brennen said. That layer works to reflect sound waves back toward the surface, he said. As the noise of the tumbling sand grains bounces around within the top-most layer of sand, Brennen said, certain low frequencies appear to become amplified, creating the mysterious boom. This speaker effect can only happen, Hunt said, if the dunes are enormous and bone-dry. The deserts therefore boom their best in the scorchingly hot summer months, making the research hot, sweaty work - perhaps the one drawback to sliding down sand dunes in the name of science. elise.kleeman@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4451 Nice seeing you at the SSSS Slappy!!!
  11. There are a lot of questions regarding CVs..... Think its time for a CV forum or atleast a sticky withh all of the info in one thread. I will be buying CVs this weekend at the show and I am wondering if spending 160 on a race prepped CV is worth it. I am guessing that at a minimum the German 930 CVs are probably my best bet and from what I gather out of some of the other threads on CVs, a set of cromolly cages are a must but does a race prepped CV really make a difference? Won't normal use ultimately "race prep" the CV on its own? Just like a set of rings on a piston wont the barrings "seat" themselves in a way that is smoother and as free as a race prepped CV? Are there different types or manufacturers that are better than others? Are there ones that I should make sure I stay away from? Is dropping down a size on bearing worth doing on a non race prepped CV? It is my understanding that all a race prepped CV is, is a CV that has been polished down a little bit to allow for smother movement? Amirite?
  12. There are a lot of questions regarding CVs..... Think its time for a CV forum or atleast a sticky withh all of the info in one thread. I will be buying CVs this weekend at the show and I am wondering if spending 160 on a race prepped CV is worth it. I am guessing that at a minimum the German 930 CVs are probably my best bet and from what I gather out of some of the other threads on CVs, a set of cromolly cages are a must but does a race prepped CV really make a difference? Won't normal use ultimately "race prep" the CV on its own? Just like a set of rings on a piston wont the barrings "seat" themselves in a way that is smoother and as free as a race prepped CV? Are there different types or manufacturers that are better than others? Are there ones that I should make sure I stay away from? Is dropping down a size on bearing worth doing on a non race prepped CV? It is my understanding that all a race prepped CV is, is a CV that has been polished down a little bit to allow for smother movement? Amirite?
  13. What should I use? what weight? Type? Synthetic? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  14. We are looking at the mid travel Sandtrix. They were the vendor on the other side of the gate by the GD.com booth.

More Links

©2001 GlamisDunes.com.
All rights reserved.

×
×
  • Create New...